Joseph Allen Freeman “Through the Ground Glass”.

Taylor Hawkins with co-director Nick Bolton have put together a nice documentary short on photographer Joseph Allen Freeman , who works almost exclusively on large format cameras. This type of photography is one that truly tests your skills as a photographer. You have to know how your equipment works inside and out. There is no Program or Auto mode. No auto focus, or bracketing. As you watch the film, Freeman talks about the process, and why it is so appealing to him. One of the things that really stands out for me is the slowness of the process. With digital photography you can work so fast, that you sometimes fail to remember the basics, what drew you to making images in the first place. As Freeman points out, with large format, you are focused on the line and texture, and composition, and the process of making the image. With this type of photography, there is no “Spray and pray”. It’s more of “I’m a confident photographer. I know I got the shot.”

Paris / New York / Split Screen.

 has taken a creative and effective way to capture two of the greatest cities in the world, Paris and New York. The video below was shot on his Canon 5D Mk III and edited together in a split screen format to show the similarities and differences of these two modern metropolises. Using realtime and time-lapse sequences MATEL stitches the two cities together with images that merge, intersect, and juxtapose each other. I couldn’t find any information on the editing and post processing techniques used to finish the film. I’m thinking it was pretty straight forward since it was all shot on the same camera and edited by one individual. Once a gain a simple yet powerful and creative idea beats special effects and heavy post processing. Enjoy.

Japan Society, “Garden of Unearthly Delights”.

If I were in New York, or going any time soon, I’d be heading to the JApan SOciety gallery for the fall exhibit which runs from Friday, October 10 through Sunday, January 11. From the video below, this looks pretty damn cool with a blend of traditional and emerging mediums. The narrator does an excelent job of summarizing the show, the artists, and the background of this group exhibition. Now I just have to figure out how I can squeeze in a trip to New York before the show closes in January.

A monster tsunami uproots a city. Modern tough guys lock samurai-style in battle. Candy-colored streams of animals and flowers hyperpixilate. These dramatic visual moments are among many to be encountered this fall in our new exhibition Garden of Unearthly Delights. The featured artists Manabu Ikeda (b. 1973, Saga Prefecture), Hisashi Tenmyouya (b. 1966, Tokyo) and the art and technology collective teamLab (est. 2001) are today’s takumi, or master artisans, taking pride in the execution of dense and precisely detailed works requiring time and contemplation to grasp. Their creative imaginations travel through time, finding inspiration in a range of styles; from medieval Buddhist paintings to contemporary anime and manga. Come stroll through their fantastical visions.

Monday Inspiration. Lilian Darmono.

Here’s a little something to start your week off with. Three animated shorts for Pearson English Learning, illustrated by the very talented Lilian Darmono and animated by Abel Reverter and Alasdair Willson from Territory. The illustrative style combined with fluid animation help take a fairly boring topic, and make it a visual treat. While I watched all of these with the volume on, I also went back and watched them with the volume off, scrubbing through the video to take in the subtle nuances that Reverter and  Wilson created.

 

1stAveMachine Animates Sonos.

1stAveMachine and director Nico Casavecchia just kill it with this series of six animated room transformations for the Sonos WiFi stereo systems. Working with 72andSunny Casavecchia and company have created some really fun spots in a variety of styles that truly memorable. I watched these three or four times trying to figure out if any of it is live action that they have blended the CG and VFX with live action footage and I don’t think they have. I think the only live action shot is the opener with the hand holding the phone. It doesn’t matter though because these are simply great, and that is what good advertising should be.

Art, Copy & Code. Nike’s “Phenomenal Shot” campaign.

The business of advertising is a tricky game. You need to keep one step ahead of the competition, constantly create memorable and unique advertisements, develop those ideas across an ever expanding horizon of channels, and constantly create something new for your client. One agency that seems to do this with ease on a regular basis is W+K and when they team up with Grow and Google they produce something really unique that shows just how the world of advertising is changing in clever new ways.

In a campaign for Nike, W+K and Grow created a series of Real-Time ads that were designed to let fans celebrate, remix, and share customized posters, and images within 10 seconds of a sporting event happening live. “Phenomenal Shot” uses a Nike sponsored player rendered  in 3D along with a series of prewritten headlines, phrases, stickers, and filters, that allow fans to remix that moment and share with friends across a variety of digital networks.

The Real-Time Ads are rendered with a  3D-Engine and then distributed via the Google Ad Network across all devices creating an immersive experience powered by HTML5, CSS, and java script. Using the gyroscope that is built in to smartphones and tablets fans can spin the Nike athlete in 3D space to create the perfect shot before embellishing with ad-ons. Since the entire experience is rendered with WebGL the experience happens within the browser and there is no need for plugins or a dedicated app. Pretty damn slick, and a great way to promote your brand without being overly pushy or doing a hard sell. For more info on #ArtCopyCode click here.

TNT – “The People Network” and How It Was Made.

Below are two videos from who produced TNT’s “The People Network” directed by Mischa Rozema. There is the original spot, and then the making of / behind the scenes video as well. The original spot is a really, really solid piece of work, but as usual I am completely fascinated by the video that shows just how complex the production of this was. One of the things I really like about the behind the scenes documentary, is the fact that they talk about developing storyboards, and using animatics to determine things like cameras, lighting, lenses, etc. All of those things are hugely important for such an ambitious project. The crew is listed below both videos and I have to say, I’m surprised its not larger considering what went into the production and post production of this spot. For more info on the production click here.

“We decided to really push what could be achieved in camera by actually creating a full size human truck on the set. It worked by having a huge, truck-sized, metal rig that could be pulled by an actual truck. We then filled it with an incredible Czech stunt team (famous for big Hollywood blockbusters) that had been rehearsing for weeks and gave the whole project a realistic approach.”

Credits TNT “THE PEOPLE NETWORK”:

Agency: Etcetera
Concept : Peter van Leeuwen, Markus Ravenhorst
Art Director : Peter van Leeuwen
Copywriter : Markus Ravenhorst
TV-producer agency : Robert Roosenstein

Date shoot : July 2014
Locations/Studios : Prague, Austria, Belgium & Amsterdam
Film / Video-Material : digital (Epic Red Dragon)

Production Company : PostPanic
Director : Mischa Rozema
Executive Producer : Jules Tervoort, Annejes van Liempd
Producer (Liege) : Liene Berina
Production Assistant : Kristian Stoykov

Post Production: PostPanic
Head of PostProduction : Ivor Goldberg
Supervisor on set : Chris Staves, Matthijs Joor

Line Production Company : Savage, Prague
Executive Producer : Klara Kralickova
Line Producer : Vojta Ruzicka
Art Direction : David Baxa
Stunt Team : Filmka stunt team, Czech Republic
Stunt Coordinator : Jiri First
Making of : Jan Svejkar

D.O.P. : Jon Gaute Espevold

Grading : Scott Harris @ Glassworks
Off-line edit : PostPanic
Editor off-line : Benjamin Putland
On-line edit : PostPanic

Music composition & Sound Design: Pivot Audio / Guy Amitai
Sound Mix: Lawrence Horne

Stills
Photographer : Jiri Svorc
Image manipulator : Nick Strong

Cast

Marek Zelinka : TNT driver, Daan Daams : wink guy, Sabina Feldmanova : customer woman, Petr Kocourek : truck driver, Mikulas Matous : Kid 1, Matej Splichal : Kid 2

Post Production team PostPanic

VFX Supervisor : Ivor Goldberg, Chris Staves
Assistant Post Producer : Liene Berina
3D & VFX Artists : Matthijs Joor, Jeroen Aerts, Chris Staves, Marti Pujol, Dimos Hadjisavvas, Juri Agostinelli, Dieuwer Feldbrugge, Guido Ekker (intern), Francois Heysen (intern)
2D/3D Artists : Doma Harkai, Erwin vd IJssel, Stefano Paron, Donat Aron Ertsey, Hubert Heutinck (intern)
Matte Painting : Marco Iozzi, Marti Pujol
Tracking & Match Moving : Giso Spijkerman

Additional Post Production:

Additional VFX support : Andrea Staiano, Thiago Porto, Dennis Volkerts, Glassworks
Rotoscoping : Dot VFX, Roto Art Studios
Motion Capture : Stepan Kment, Bohemia Interactive a.s.