Photographic Bang Bang.

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With the Fourth of July just 2 days away, what could be more fitting than something about fireworks. The video below shows artist Ross Sonnenberg creating some insanely great abstract photographs using one of his favorite secret ingredients. Fireworks. Sonnenburg uses a host of other tools to create the images, including  gel, sand and light, but the fireworks give it a special twist. The results are beautiful, intensely colored one of a kind photograms. Each image is a random chance experiment full of texture, color, line, and shapes all created without a camera.

“For my latest body of work entitled “The Big Bang”, I had become fascinated with the photogram. In my research artists such as Mariah Robertson, Susan Derges and especially Marco Breuer are doing work that I admire. I became intrigued by the possibilities of this photographic process. I thought to myself “What can I bring that maybe could be interesting to me?”

     My light source of choice would be fireworks of varying persuasions, combined with other materials. Interestingly, the images (Which were few and far between) were looking like fictional galaxies, with all their beautiful imperfections resembled our images of our real solar system, ironically created by the first Big Bang millions of years ago.”

From Sonnenberg’s website

Sonnenberg varies the scale of the images. He has two previous series that smaller scale works Color Bang. And Long Bang which is a series of larger scale works created with larger more powerful fireworks.

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Alphabets of Wood.

alphabetswood_fullI’ll admit it, I’m a type junkie. I have been for a long time, and there is no 12 step program to cure me of this affliction. It’s part of being a graphic designer, and someone who has spent the better part of his adult life playing with, using and building with typography to create something new and unique.

This morning when I was out on the Hamilton Wood Type Museum website (yes there is a museum dedicated to wood typography) I came across a book for sale that will be going into my reference stack asap.

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“Alphabets of Wood. Luigi Melchiori and the history of Italian wood type” is the most recent addition to the latest wave of books dedicated to the history of wood type used in printing presses before digital, and before metal type became the standards of the day. It is also the first book to seriously look at the historical and cultural significance of Italian wood type manufacturers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

“This book sprung from an encounter with the life and work of Luigi Melchiori, a skilled craftman who lived and worked during the late ninteenth and early twentieth centuries in Crespano del Grappa – a small community at the foothills of the Alps in the Veneto Region. It is a tribute to a maker of alphabets of wood. The authors, James Clough and Chiara Scattolin, develop a private and professional artist’s profile, the history of the wood type and its progressive use in typography. The archive “Luigi Melchiori” is part of Tipoteca Italiana’s collections.”

 

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Mangal

Since it’s summer and I have a backyard again, I have been on the lookout for a stylish modern barbecue. I’m a huge fan of charcoal and wood burning grills and this morning I came across “Mangal” from Cisimdesign.

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Cisimdesign is an Istanbul based firm that has been in operation since 2009. This year at the 2015 Milan Design Week, Cisimdesign introduced Mangal at Ventura Lambrate. Mangal literally means  barbecue in Turkish. The design is indicative of Cisimdesign’s philosophy of taking every day objects and transforming them into an object with a different function.

“Although ” Mangal ” suggests an object of heating and cooking, it offers a comfortable resting place with storage place in the interior.”

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The simple vessel shape is reminiscent of a vase or planter. The simple 3 leg stand gives it the appearance of perhaps a stool. The interchangeable grills are reflective of fabric patterns, another daily object transformed for another use. There isn’t any pricing info given on the website, but there is a contact email. It’ll be interesting to see if this makes it into large scale production. It’s a beautiful object, that I’d love to cook on.

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Pull&Bear Bring VW Vans to the Citadium.

To mark the opening of Pull&Bear at the Citadium in Paris, the store contacted 4 international artist and asked them to unleash their creative juices on classic VW vans. The Vans were painted white and used as the canvas for each artist to work there magic.

Italian artist Michela Picchi, produces works for magazines, and multiple brands. She draws inspiration from collage works and psychedelia with a modern and sophisticated twist. Picchi is now based in Berlin Germany.

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Shoboshobo is a Paris native with a strong link to Japan and Japanese culture. He has worked in a range of disciplines within the field of graphic design as well as the music industry. His work is exhibited in multiple countries and can be seen in galleries through out Europe. His primary style features are a lack of color and a personal universe of half disturbing, half tender figures which he depicts with a pop touch.

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Martina Paukova is a Slovakian illustrator living and working out of London. Her career has provided illustrations for a wide range of clients ranging from international magazines, museums, ad agencies, schools and other institutions. Her colorful work is inspired by vintage images and texts.

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Kyle Platt is a prolific graphic artist and illustrator based in the UK. His career has taken many turns from entertainer to social critic, but he is primarily known for work he has done for such clients as the New York Times, and Vice. His work reminds me of artist Jim Nutt, and like Nutt’s works you will either love it or hate it, but you definitely won’t be left without an opinion on it.

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Dustin Cohen’s “Conrad and the Steamplant”.

This morning a friend of mine sent me the link to the video below. “Conrad and the Steamplant” is the product of photographer Dustin Cohen. This is the latest in a series of short films he has produced over the last year or so, and like his previous short films this one profiles an individual in New York with a unique job. It is a striking portrait of Pratt Institute’s Chief Engineer  which  follows the story of 79-year-old Conrad Milster.  Milster started working at the steamplant in 1965 and is one of only four to hold his position at Pratt in its 127-year history. Like all of Choen’s works this is a beautifully shot and edited documentary short that is well worth the watch and a great way to start your work week.

Connected Worlds, Design I/O, and open Frameworks.

I love this stuff. What a great blend of technology, design, animation, and art. In a 3000 square foot space in the New York Hall of Science there is an immersive installation that allows children to directly interact with the space. Composed of six interactive ecosystems spread across the walls of the great hall, children are encouraged to use both physical items in the space as well as interact with the projected digital components. All of the surfaces are interactive and engaging.

Connected Worlds was designed to encourage children to think about sustainability and how all of these natural systems are interlinked, where local action on the environment may have global consequences later on. Children work with a fixed amount of water in the system and have to work together to manage and distribute the water across the different environments. Clouds return water from the environments to the waterfall which releases water to the floor when it rains.

Children can use physical logs to divert water flowing across the floor from the waterfall into the different environments, where they can then use their hands to plant seeds. As the different environments bloom, creatures appear based on the health of the environment and the type of plants growing in it. If multiple environments are healthy creatures will migrate between them causing interesting chain reactions of behaviors.

The immersive experience was built using  openFrameworks an open source creative coding toolkit. The project was conceived and developed by Design I/O with the New York Hall of Science by Emily Gobeille, Theo Watson and Nicholas Hardeman. Additional design and animation work was produced Josh Goodrich and game consultation by Zach Gage. Sound Design by MOST Original Soundtracks.

The first video below shows the space in action. The second video is the behind the scenes / making of video for those of you that want to geek out on how they pulled this off.

HIAS: For the Refugee.

HIAS is the 130 year old American charity organization working to address the global refugee crisis. To get their message out, HIAS used London animation and illustration studio Moth Collective to create a compelling story about their history and how the organization has changed over the last 100 years. Written by Paul Wolfe, and illustrated and animated by Claudio Salas, Daniela Negrin Ochoa, Joe Bichard, and Jennifer Zheng, the two and a half minute video is moving and visually beautiful. Moth uses a limited color pallet with dark sweeping transitions to move you from the beginning of their story to the present day. Frames are highlighted with occasional accent colors that play off of the main red, white, blue and black color pallet. Its a really nice piece for a really wonderful organization.