Duik 15 for After Effects.

If you do any kind of character animation work in After Effects, you know the built in tools can be a bit limiting. Rigging parts to move together is time consuming and awkward, the puppet tool only goes so far, and results from both can be frustrating. Thankfully Duik 15 from DuDuf is coming later this month and it looks pretty damn amazing. The video below walks through a ton of new features, and then rolls into a show reel with some killer animations built using the plugin for After Effects. The video starts out in silent mode. Don’t adjust your speakers. When it gets to the show reel part the audio comes up.

Friday Inspiration. The Carnegie Mellon Swiss Poster Collection.

I’m always on the look out for good sources of inspiration, and this morning I found a great one. The Carnegie Mellon Swiss Poster Collection with over 300 images from 1970 through 2009. The extensive collection was established by Swiss graphic designer Ruedi Ruegg and Professor Daniel Boyarski, and contains works from designers Max Bill, Paul Bruhwiler, Ruedi Kulling, Herbert Leupin, Josef Muller-Brockmann, Roger Pfund, Ruedi Ruegg, Niklaus Troxler, Wolfgang Weingart, Kurt Wirth, R. Schraivogel, Cornel Windlin, and many more.





Munch | Van Gogh

It’s the middle of the week, and I have spent the last 2 days looking for inspiration for a project I am working on. This afternoon while trolling Vimeo, I came across this short film for the Van Gogh Museum directed by Tom Geraedts. It’s a great concept and really fun to watch. Now I just wish I had the time and resources to go see the Munch exhibit in Amsterdam.

Pantone Smoothies.

Because it’s Friday. Because it’s Pantone. Because these are smoothies.

Art director Hedvig A. Kushner of  Mother New York  makes a lot of smoothies. Hedvig also noticed it kinda works like mixing paint. You add a certain ingredient, you get a certain color. So Hedvig started a little project about making some tasty smoothies that match Pantone color chips. Pantone Smoothies

Kushner buys colored paper from a local art store, matches it to a Pantone swatch, and makes the smoothie to match whatever color the swatch is. Then along with photographer Mike Kushner each is photographed three times. One shot with the ingredients, the second with the resulting smoothie, then the matching Pantone swatch.

You can check out the project at pantonesmoothies.com, and you can submit your own on the site, or via Instagram.



Gatorade’s 360 Degree Immersive Baseball Experience is Pretty Damn Cool.

With the Kansas City Royals about to clinch their first division title in 30 years my head has been a little baseball focused these days. This afternoon I came across a new interactive ad from Gatorade designed to work in Chrome, or the latest mobile app version of YouTube. Yes unfortunately for some, you have to check this out in Chrome.

What we have is a 360 degree virtual reality baseball experience that puts you the viewer in Bryce Harpers Point of View (I wish it was a Royals player though). When you load the video you can pan around the stadium from the on deck circle while waiting to get up to bat in the bottom of the 9th. Then you get to go toe to toe with a Major League pitcher and see if you can smack a fastball out of the park.


It’s a great use of technology with little product placement or marketing going on. It is however memorable and there is a tiny little Gatorade logo in the bottom right corner of the video reminding you who brought you this experience.

More Than The Score.

I never saw this promo air during the US Open. It might have played locally, but since I tend to mute, pause and skip, or record then blast past ads, I probably just missed it. Produced by BUCK for IBM and Ogilvy & Mather, the animated short features loads of data visualizations done up in an entertaining way, set to the beat of Andrew W.K’s “I Love New York City”. In typical fashion BUCK nails the animation and brand styling for IBM. It’s worth watching all the way through if for no other reason than the facts they present about the US Open and New York. Oh they get extra points for going with a square format for the finished piece.

Bikes, Motorcycles, Cars, Boats, Race Cars, Robots and Planes.

The video below was all done in camera. While there might have been some post work done here, the important thing to think about is, the animation was all done in camera. That means the pre-planning and visualization for this spot had to be perfect before they started shooting. Why? because New York-based stop-motion artist Adam Pesapane has 3000 unique shots here. I’m sure there were a lot of reshot sections and do-overs, but still I’m sure this was planned out down to the last details. The total time to build and complete was around 4 months, and it shows. The animation is seamless, and the quality is fantastic, which just goes to show that quality takes time and can’t be rushed.