Travel, Architecture, Food, and Cocktails.

A poster series after my own heart. What could be better than travel, architecture, food and cocktails? This series of posters created by Dublin based design studio me&him&you features 14 great world cities that are identified by architectural landmarks and a signature drink or food for each. The 17 by 24 inch one color posters are silkscreened onto 190 gram Rothmill cream paper,with solvent free, water based ink. Each poster is hand numbered and signed.

Prints are delivered rolled in a strong postage tube packed in acid-free tissue paper. Each print is accompanied with an information slip about the project, blind embossed with our company seal. At sixty Euro, or about $75.00 I know what I’m adding to my Christmas wish list.

BerlinPrint-570x712

boston2-570x712

HongKong-570x712

mehimyou.BarcelonaC-570x712

mehimyou.Chicago-570x712

mehimyou.Copenhagen-570x712

mehimyou.Dublin-570x712

mehimyou.Melbourne-570x712

mehimyou.Oslo_-570x712

mehimyou.SanFrancisco-570x712

mehimyou.Stockholm-570x712

mehimyou.Sydney2-570x712

mehimyou.TOKYO_-570x712

mehimyou.Zurich-570x712

Paris-570x712

Toronto-570x712

 

 

 

 

Kaplan Recommends “8 Great Things to do in London”.

The video below is the animated teaser for Kaplan International English integrated campaign I Love London. Created by Al Boardman and following on the heels of the awesome animated New York city guide, Kaplan asked more than 500 of their students what they thought the perfect day in London would be. Taking all the information they received they distilled it down to the 8 top choices for the city which Boardman then animated. The animation directs the viewer to the I Love London page where others are encouraged to post and share their dream day London, as well as see a brief synopsis about each of Kaplan’s top 8 picks. Hat tip to Boardman for creating such a fun, fresh, and cheerful animated piece.

It’s Going To Be A “Heart Winter”.

I’m not a fan of McDonalds food, but you have to hand it to their advertising. It’s usually top notch, and they do hire the best. McDonalds AOR Leo Burnett hired BUCK to produce the new animated TV spot for the McCafe line of hot drinks. Directed by Ryan Honey BUCK blends 2D and 3D animation seamlessly in the 30 second spot titled “Heart Winter”. The spot features nicely stylized, but not overly cute character’s clever transitions between scenes, and a fluid animation style all set to a jangly happy tune.  It’s hard not to like the look of the commercial, even if you aren’t a fan of McDonalds.

Executive Creative Director: Ryan Honey
Executive Producer: Maurie Enochson
Associate Creative Directors: Jenny Ko, Steve Day
CG Supervisor: Doug Wilkinson
Producer: Billy Mack
Production Coordinator: Kaitlyn Mahoney
Storyboards: Morgan Schweitzer, Vincent Lee, Marcus Park, Susan Yung
Design: Jenny Ko, Yuki Yamada, Susan Yung, Gunnar Pettersson, Ken Gunn Lee, Joe Mullen
Cel Animation: Kendra Ryan, Kyle Mowat, Eric Cheng, Laura Yilmaz, Craig Yamamoto, Ben Conkin, Song Kim
AE Animation & Compositing: Nick Petley, Simon Ekstrand Appel, Anthony Madlangbayan, Zach Eastburg, Esteban Esquivo, Jake Portman, Ariel Costa
3D Artists: Wing Lee, Florent Raffray

 

Dan Wood’s “Kansas City Lights”.

Over the weekend I received an email from film maker Dan Wood with a link to a video he uploaded to Vimeo about a month ago. The time-lapse short film features the unique and diverse architecture of Kansas city as seen at night. With all the positive press our city has been receiving lately I thought I would share his video.

Shot at over 30 locations, and made up of more than 6900 individual photos, this short film captures the beauty of Kansas City. As a long time resident, I drive or walk by many of these buildings on a daily basis, but never stop to examine them. What I love about Wood’s film is he has captured the architecture in a unique way that showcases the architectural detail, drama, and location in such memorable way.

If you are from here or familiar with Kansas City, try and name all the locations without cheating and looking at the list below.

In order of appearance:
Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts
Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
The Christopher S. Bond Bridge
Bloch Building – The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Country Club Plaza
Kansas City Star
Crown Center
Kansas City Power and Light Building
Sporting Park – GO SPORTING!!
Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts
Kauffman Stadium – GO ROYALS!!
Western Auto Building
Arrowhead Stadium – GO CHIEFS!!
Boulevard Brewery
New York Life Building
The Kansas City Museum at Corinthian Hall
Gem Theater – 18th and Vine Jazz District
Kemper Arena
Union Station
Kansas City International Airport
Sprint Center
KCPT Tower
Rosedale World War I Memorial Arch
Broadway Bridge
Kansas City Municipal Auditorium Arena
Kansas City City Hall
Bartle Hall Convention Center
Liberty Memorial Tower at National World War I Museum

Joseph Allen Freeman “Through the Ground Glass”.

Taylor Hawkins with co-director Nick Bolton have put together a nice documentary short on photographer Joseph Allen Freeman , who works almost exclusively on large format cameras. This type of photography is one that truly tests your skills as a photographer. You have to know how your equipment works inside and out. There is no Program or Auto mode. No auto focus, or bracketing. As you watch the film, Freeman talks about the process, and why it is so appealing to him. One of the things that really stands out for me is the slowness of the process. With digital photography you can work so fast, that you sometimes fail to remember the basics, what drew you to making images in the first place. As Freeman points out, with large format, you are focused on the line and texture, and composition, and the process of making the image. With this type of photography, there is no “Spray and pray”. It’s more of “I’m a confident photographer. I know I got the shot.”

Paris / New York / Split Screen.

 has taken a creative and effective way to capture two of the greatest cities in the world, Paris and New York. The video below was shot on his Canon 5D Mk III and edited together in a split screen format to show the similarities and differences of these two modern metropolises. Using realtime and time-lapse sequences MATEL stitches the two cities together with images that merge, intersect, and juxtapose each other. I couldn’t find any information on the editing and post processing techniques used to finish the film. I’m thinking it was pretty straight forward since it was all shot on the same camera and edited by one individual. Once a gain a simple yet powerful and creative idea beats special effects and heavy post processing. Enjoy.

Japan Society, “Garden of Unearthly Delights”.

If I were in New York, or going any time soon, I’d be heading to the JApan SOciety gallery for the fall exhibit which runs from Friday, October 10 through Sunday, January 11. From the video below, this looks pretty damn cool with a blend of traditional and emerging mediums. The narrator does an excelent job of summarizing the show, the artists, and the background of this group exhibition. Now I just have to figure out how I can squeeze in a trip to New York before the show closes in January.

A monster tsunami uproots a city. Modern tough guys lock samurai-style in battle. Candy-colored streams of animals and flowers hyperpixilate. These dramatic visual moments are among many to be encountered this fall in our new exhibition Garden of Unearthly Delights. The featured artists Manabu Ikeda (b. 1973, Saga Prefecture), Hisashi Tenmyouya (b. 1966, Tokyo) and the art and technology collective teamLab (est. 2001) are today’s takumi, or master artisans, taking pride in the execution of dense and precisely detailed works requiring time and contemplation to grasp. Their creative imaginations travel through time, finding inspiration in a range of styles; from medieval Buddhist paintings to contemporary anime and manga. Come stroll through their fantastical visions.