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Push It With Intel.

Intel has always done a really solid job of promoting their brand and products. Intel is also a company that is heavily invested in digital convergence marketing tools, tying physical and digital spaces together quite well. One of their latest campaigns is “Push” an old school arcade game tied to a social media campaign, attached to a game where the grand prize is a new Ultrabook.

It’s a fairly simple concept. You connect with Facebook or Twitter and get in line. When your turn comes up, your name in 3D block letters is pulled by a robotic arm and placed on the table. Then those letters are pushed forward in the stack. If your name is the one to push it off stage, you win. The game plays out in real-time, streamed to the web.

DDB Spain, Polowers.

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Tweet races, Twitter games, and Twitter based competitions are nothing new, but occasionally one comes along that really works. Case in point VW’s #polowers campaign created by DDB Spain. The numbers in the video are pretty impressive, even though the number of participants was only 4075. This collective race, generated over 150,000 tweets with the hashtag #Polowers in 8 hours averaging 5 tweets per second. On top of that the campaign reached more than 10% of Spain’s global twitter audience. In addition, the game generated a vast amount of visits to Polo´s product section on www.volkswagen.es, reaching a record of its history. The screen shot above is from the integrated website that was developed for the game. Unfortunately it has been pulled down.

Meet Mr. Wolfdog, Executive Director of Marketing for Old Spice.

When it comes to integrated marketing that leverages social media to it’s best you can’t do better than Old Spice.

The latest campaign to introduce the new line of wild scents is being handled by Mr. WolfDog, who is the new executive director of marketing. Along with a YouTube channel, he has a Twitter feed, a Tumblr page, a Facebook account, a hangout on Google+ (where internet users could apply to work as the WolfDog assistant #workforwolfdog) and an animated gif file.

 

Everyone of these spaces is branded with integrated elements that reach across the entire campaign and all of it’s touch points. In the first two days, the YouTube video alone has reached more than 250,000 people.

 

Got GAME? If You Golf, You Should.

I’m not a golfer. I don’t own clubs and I can’t even remember the last time I was on the fairway or even at a driving range. It doesn’t mean I don’t like the game, it just isn’t in the forefront of things I do. If you are a golfer “GAME”, which has managed to raise 127,000 in funding on indigogo is probably something you are going to want.

GAME is a dynamically connected product that tracks, maps and records your round of golf automatically logging each stat. The wearable device connects to your smart phone or computer allowing you to review the entire game and improve skills. In addition it is socially aware allowing you to share your results with social network giants like Facebook and Twitter. GAME records every club you use, every swing you make, and calculates the key stats for each including your scoring, the number of putts, greens in regulation, driving accuracy and more.

The device is the brainchild of Galway, Ireland, John McGuire and a small team of engineers. The physical design of the product is by Yves Behar which gets extra points from me.

Almost but Not Quite. KLM Must See Map, no App.

KLM has been a big participant in promotional marketing campaigns grounded in social media for sometime. The video below shows the latest from the Dutch airline. The “Must See Map” is built on suggestions of things to do, and places to see from friends responses to a social media query. It asks the traveler to simply ask friends in their social network where they have been and what they have done, then gathers all of this information into a single source.

What is great about this campaign is the fact that KLM will send you a print on demand high-res physical map. What I don’t like is the fact that the map will take 3 weeks to arrive, and there is no dedicated smartphone app. The free online site does a great job of integrating with all of the major social network players, allowing the traveler to gather vast amounts of tips but offers no dedicated smartphone app.

While the physical map is a cool souvenir for your trip, and ties to all the places your socially networked friends tell you to go; it is quite surprising that KLM didn’t take this one step further. A dedicated app is much easier to carry and use than a physical printed map. A dedicated app allows for recommendations to come to you long after the map is printed. A dedicated app allows the traveler to post feedback on friends recommendations. A dedicated app, takes the concept to a whole new level, and extends use far beyond the interaction of the website.

KLM

This is a great concept, and I hope that KLM goes a little further with it. KLM currently has 10 apps that they have developed for the iPhone, so I could see them taking this to a whole new level. When they do, “Must See Map” will be a home run.

People Come, and People Go, on the Facebook.

Facebook_logoI used to be an avid Facebook user. Like most people a few years ago I was posting all sorts of things I found on my wall, plus photos, snarky quips, comments and other assorted digital ephemera. Over the last couple of years though my interest in Facebook has waned, and while I still check it, it’s not nearly as often as it used to be. For some time now I haven’t felt alone. It feels as though many of my friends have cooled on Facebook as well, and it turns out my feelings might have been right.

Pew Research released a research report this morning that noted 61% Facebook users have begun to take a break of at least several weeks from Facebook for a variety of reasons, an onslaught of gossip, over-sharing, quality of people’s posts, worthless information, advertising, privacy etc.

This doesn’t mean that the social network giant is losing steam. At least not in the good old USA. 67% of American’s have a Facebook account, as compared to only 16% using Twitter. By its own count, Facebook Inc. has 1.06 billion users worldwide who check in at least once a month. (This number does include millions of duplicate and fake accounts.) Out of that 1.6 billion more than 150 million users are in the U.S.

What the Pew study does suggest is people are using Facebook less. The study determined that 7% of all internet users used to participate on Facebook and now no longer have accounts at all. Another 20% said that they were simply too busy with their own lives to follow the constant stream of status updates, quotes and photos posted by others or to post them themselves.

Now with all that said, here are some other interesting finds from the study:

  • 59 percent of Facebook users said the site is about as important to them as it was a year ago.
  • 12 percent said Facebook is more important to them than it was a year ago and 28 percent said it has become less important.
  • 8 percent said they took a break from Facebook because they were spending too much time using it.
  • 69 percent said they plan to spend the same amount of time on Facebook in the coming year. Twenty-seven percent plan to spend less time on the site and 3 percent, more time.

In response to the Pew study Facebook said that its growth and user engagement remains strong. “As we announced last week, Facebook has grown daily active users across all regions, ending the year with more than 1 billion monthly active users, 618 million daily active users and 680 million people accessing Facebook from mobile devices,” according to a company statement. “Our announcement came on the heels of independent analyst reports which concluded that Facebook is the most downloaded mobile app in the U.S., and that time spent on Facebook accounts for over 20 percent of all time spent on mobile apps in the US.” and I’m sure it is. My question is, does this indicate the beginning of a shift in social networking habits?

In internet terms, Facebook is now old. It has been around for more than five years and as we all know, internet user attention spans are short. Even though it has become a ubiquitous part of many people’s lives, I can see where people are getting tired of it, and are looking for the latest flavor of the month.

The next year or so should be an interesting one for Facebook and company. They purchased the next big thing in social networking, “Instagram”, but with the controversy surrounding changes to Instagram’s privacy settings many longtime users jumped ship.  Other emerging social platforms are nipping away at Facebook, but will probably have little impact on them. So I wonder will Facebook fade, or be eclipsed by some yet unknown platform created in a dorm-room by a 20 something soon to be college drop out?

 

Fly Delta for the iPad.

As more and more companies try to invent ways of being a more relevant brand experience for their customer base, many are looking to lifestyle branding as a solution. 10 years ago Delta Airlines would have leveraged itself as a “services” brand highlighting things like the least amount of delays, on time record, more cities than any other airline, etc. With the launch of the new iPad Fly Delta app, it seems fairly apparent they want to be seen as a lifestyle brand by connecting with you, the savvy travel before, during, and after your trip.

The new app not only helps you book your flight and check in, it also makes suggestions for entertainment, dining, and shopping. It connects all of the top social networks and makes intelligent recommendations for you based on your posts, checkins, and what your friends are saying and doing. The app itself looks pretty good, although I’m not sure it will change that many peoples brand perception of Delta.

One big question is, how do you use it on the flight if your plane doesn’t have WiFi?