ClipDrop Lets You Copy and Paste Objects from The Real World Into Photoshop.

I’m always on the look out for new tools that can help improve my workflow, or reduce painstaking tasks in applications like Photoshop and Illustrator from Adobe. Today I discovered one of those new tools.

Paris based developers Cyril Diagne and Jonathan Blanchet have developed a brilliant app called ClipDrop. ClipDrop lets you take photos of objects in the real world and place them into programs on your desktop computer. Using augmented reality and AI, ClipDrop can extract objects, people, drawings, and text, and then paste them into desktop applications.

It’s pretty slick, especially the text extraction, and i could see this being used quite a bit for a variety projects.

My only gripe is, like so many other applications these days, you can’t just buy it. ClipDrop has a subscription based model that costs $79.99 a year. Although it looks like it might still be on sale for $39.99. Either way, subscriptions suck as far as I’m concerned. I’m tired of getting nickle and dimed in perpetuity for a tool I could use daily. Yes I’d pay a bit more for a one time purchase.

You don’t see carpenters subscribing to hammer and saw services each year. Hey that might be a million dollar opportunity.

ATK PLN Graphics Package for the Atlantic Festival 2020

The Atlantic, like everyone else in 2020 has been turned on it’s head thanks to the Covid 19 Pandemic. Normally the Atlantic Festival would be an in person event that lasts for 3 days in September, but this year The Atlantic moved everything online for obvious reasons.

When you move a live event to an exclusively online event, one thing that needs to happen is a level of consistency across all of the visual components. Especially since your target audience is probably a little burned out from all the Zoom and Microsoft Teams meetings they have attended over the last 8 months.

To achieve this the Atlantic turned to ATK PLN to develop a consistent look that could be applied across all Zoom screens, the website, videos, and other support materials. If you take the look of the video above and then jump over to the website, and the YouTube channel you can see how they pulled everything together with a very simple identity system that is effective while not distracting from the onscreen content – the speakers.

I especially love the animated swooping yellow line on the webpage. It’s such a nice simple touch.

“In 2020, premiere conferences and events are no longer working to elevate their experience from the year before, but are instead challenged with a drastic pivot to an entirely virtual experience.

For The Atlantic Festival, their 2020 virtual event in September continued to bring on revered speakers including Hillary Rodham Clinton, Dr. Anthony Fauci, Samantha Bee, and Billy Porter.

Don Mischer Productions brought on design-first creative studio ATK PLN to elevate the virtual 2020 Atlantic Festival using a broadcast level graphics package, enhancing the viewing experience for participants.

With a Zoom-fatigued audience tuning in to be enlightened, engaged, and inspired, ATK PLN paid careful attention to bringing heightened production values that would distinguish this experience from the daily lineup of virtual meetings they had become accustomed to.

The ATK PLN team crafted an original opening sequence for the virtual event that also served as a promotional trailer for the conference, with the words literally jumping off the page in a whirling movement of typeface highlighting the latest top headlines.

The design-driven piece is a graphic realization of The Atlantic’s mission to illuminate the American idea, bringing to life some of the publication’s most thought-provoking pieces of 2020 with flowing text cascading out of one story and fusing together in the next.

In addition to the opening sequence, ATK PLN also created a comprehensive graphics package for use across all of the event’s virtual sessions, creating a cohesive visual aesthetic that would convey the premium experience of this marquee event.

This mirrored the standard offerings of a broadcast design package, including original backgrounds, animated logos, lower thirds, titles, transitions, text backgrounds, idents, and screen bugs. This strategy transported viewers out of a stale and generic video interface and into a fully designed and cohesive platform as carefully curated as its in-person versions.”

Don Mischer Productions

How To Be Alone – for the On Being Project

Having recently gone through the loss of my second parent, I can tell you that even though you are surrounded by loved ones and friends, you are at times overcome by a complete sense of “aloneness”. And it’s OK. The feeling will sneak up on you and be triggered by the smallest of things. You are caught up in a memory, and then reminded that you are in a sense an orphan even though you’re still married, have siblings, close friends, and extended family.

Today while catching up with the latest On Being podcast I bounced over to Vimeo to watch one of their latest animated shorts. It was on a topic that is reflective of what I wrote above – being alone. This wonderful short animated film by Leo G. Franchi was written and read by Pádraig Ó Tuama for The On Being Project. It brings up the topic and places it in front of the viewer delivering its message with a calmness that captures those feelings, that that are sometimes, more often than not associated with being alone – anxiety, quietness, distance, awkwardness – and lets you know that its OK. That you simply need to breathe. To be aware of yourself and know you are alive at this moment in a universe that is forever changing.

LA Trance by Ben Radatz

I’m going to date myself with this post. Back in the early 1980’s, probably 80 or 81 I was at a shopping mall and happened to be in some store that sold home furnishings like plates, containers, small appliances, glassware and such.

The reason I remember this so well is because at the time I was blown away by row after row of teal, baby blue, and cinnamon-colored plastic items that looked like a mash-up of 1930’s art deco, and mid-century modern. It was as though the designer of this particular line of products had been channeling 1930’s Raymond Lowe and 1950’s George Nelson, and filtering them through 30 to 40 years of separation.

It was as though a faded memory of what these periods were like, or a memory that somehow blurred the line between the two periods and imposed a kitschy rendition of what it must have been like to have been there a few decades back.

This was common in the early 1980s. Look back at TV graphics from this period and you’ll see the same 1950s aesthetic applied with loads of pink, black, and teal all run through a New Wave blender creating a unique look that lasted a few years. Maybe I’m feeling more aware of this because of the album covers of bands I listened to back then.

Ah New Wave records from the early 1980s. 1980 to 1985 was such a good decade.

The reason I bring this up is that the video below brought all of this back to me this afternoon. The video itself is really well done, featuring some solid animation, great illustration qualities, and an electronic music soundtrack by Four Tet. The thing is though, it feels like a 2020 take on a 1980’s take of something from the 1950s. And there is nothing wrong with that. It just got me to thinking about all of the trends that get resurfaced, reworked, and filtered through decades of separation and made into something new.

The timing and transitions to the changes in the music are fantastic. The style of the illustration while reminiscent of something familiar to the late 1970s and early 1980s is original to Ben Radatz with an elegant look to them. The color pallet enhances the feeling of the 3 minute short and captures the city of Los Angeles. He even features Miss Donuts and Circus Liquor (an LA icon you should go if you are ever in the San Fernando Valley area)