Animation

The Light in the Dark

It’s generally been a crappy week for a lot of people in the world. hurricane’s, monsoon’s, wild fires, nut job dictators launching missiles, political crap, economic collapse, and so much more. Unfortunately, that’s life, and while we can’t change it, we can at least accept the fact that things get better. It’s Wednesday afternoon and I just watched a really wonderful animation that was written by Hannah Maschoff, directed and animated by Eli Guillou, about loss, and moving forward. Shine a little light into your afternoon and enjoy the story and visuals.

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It’s Hard To Hate The Solar Eclipse.

After a hate filled week of neo nazi protests in Virginia, and terrorism in Spain, I decided to post something that everyone in the world can agree on. The Solar Eclipse on Monday is going to be pretty damn amazing. It’s pretty hard to hate the forces of nature as the shadow of the moon turns day into night in the Path of Totality. The video below features the voices of eclipse chasers as they talk about why they are so fascinated by and drawn to solar eclipse events. The animation was done by Sophie Koko Gate for Vox. Great stuff. Watch and enjoy a hate free 5 minute animated short film.

From Ashes to Art

The video below is part of a digital media campaign to help rebuild the Mackintosh Building which was destroyed by fire in 2014. The Glasgow School of Art’s Mackintosh building, a symbol of British art, was reduced to ash and out of the ruins came a brilliant idea, turn the charcoal into works of art. From the ashes of the building, artists were supplied with charcoal to create works of art that were auctioned off by Christies in March. The proceeds from the auction are being used to rebuild the Mackintosh building. The animated short captures the feeling of hand-drawn charcoal and highlight how some of the artists engaged with the medium. Unfortunately, the website feels like a bit of an afterthought and is less than exciting. There is a section that shows the pieces created though, which is worth checking out.

Friday Fun. Symmetry Behind The Laws of Nature.

It’s Friday, time to learn something while enjoying this nice little animation from the Royal Institute. Produced by Ed Prosser, directed and animated byRosanna Wan, with sound design by Marian Mentrup this 4 minute short teaches about the laws of symmetry in nature and physics. You’ll learn about Emmy Noether’s theory that proves the need for symmetry and much more. Narrated by Tara Shears, this is an easy to follow piece with a great look and a nice rhythm to it. The weekend is here, get lost in a little bit of physics.

Dress Code for Project Ellis

Dress Code has produced a really nice animated short for Project Ellis, an organization dedicated helping immigrants to the United States by providing advice, legal counsel, or money. There is a website hat is listed at the end of the short film, but it’s not quite ready for primetime. The testimonials page still has lorem ipsum greeking text on it. None the less the animation from Dress Code has a really solid look to it with a hint of mid-century modern design that reminds me of the look that Childcraft “How and Why” books I had as a kid. Oh and if you are unaware as to how the fourth and fifth amendments to the United States Constitution work, this will give a quick overview of what they are and how to use them.

BRIKK Animates the State of the Planet

For the last month and a half, along with my daily workload, I had been producing a bunch of stuff for last week’s InfoComm 17 which all but consumed my waking hours. Now that the show has past, and looks like it will be a huge success for my company, I decided to take some time this Monday morning and do some research and get some inspiration. The video below from BRIKK is a three and a half minute animation that is beautifully executed and provides you with some food for thought on this Monday morning. Follow along as BRIKK explores the major milestones that have shaped the world as Earth moves farther into the Anthropocene – the latest geologic epoch named for humanity’s influence on the globe. Get lost in the lush textures, rich color pallet, and illustrative storytelling. Then ask yourself, “Is there intelligent life on planet earth?”

John Carpenter’s First Music Memory.

A couple weeks ago Device pushed out to Vimeo a wonderful little animated short.  The film is narrated by John Carpenter, as he explains his first music memory. The animation is really nice with great transitions between the scenes using the current frame to morph into the next scene as the story unfolds. The limited color palette and subtle textures help to frame the narrative as it unfolds, with all of it drawing you in and holding you captive for a minute and a half. Great stuff, and like all good stories it got me to thinking about my first music memory. I was sitting in my bedroom upstairs with the window open, and my mom was playing Harry Belafonte singing “Midnight Special” on the record player in her studio. The studio window was open and the sound just floated out across the yard

I was sitting in my bedroom upstairs with the window open, and my mom was playing Harry Belafonte singing “Midnight Special” on the record player in her studio. The studio window was open and the sound just floated out across the yard and upstairs. It was summer. It was warm, and I was sitting in the sunlight on the floor playing with Lego. I was 3 or maybe 4. I hadn’t started Kindergarten yet, so I know I was younger than 5. I know I heard music before that, but this is the first time that the total experience stuck with me and permanently burned into my memory.