Health and Wellness

How To Be Alone – for the On Being Project

Having recently gone through the loss of my second parent, I can tell you that even though you are surrounded by loved ones and friends, you are at times overcome by a complete sense of “aloneness”. And it’s OK. The feeling will sneak up on you and be triggered by the smallest of things. You are caught up in a memory, and then reminded that you are in a sense an orphan even though you’re still married, have siblings, close friends, and extended family.

Today while catching up with the latest On Being podcast I bounced over to Vimeo to watch one of their latest animated shorts. It was on a topic that is reflective of what I wrote above – being alone. This wonderful short animated film by Leo G. Franchi was written and read by Pádraig Ó Tuama for The On Being Project. It brings up the topic and places it in front of the viewer delivering its message with a calmness that captures those feelings, that that are sometimes, more often than not associated with being alone – anxiety, quietness, distance, awkwardness – and lets you know that its OK. That you simply need to breathe. To be aware of yourself and know you are alive at this moment in a universe that is forever changing.

“RowFree” The Concept 2 iPad Holder is a Winner

I have used a Concept 2 rower for physical exercise for longer than I can remember. It is such a great workout and the C2 is built like a tank. If you can swing it, I highly recommend picking one up.

Like all rowers except for the Hydrow the workout can be a bit boring. You are going back and forth for 45 minutes to an hour with an occasional break for stretching or interval weight training. To combat the boredom I use a pair of Bluetooth earbuds that I have paired with my phone so I can listen to music or books on tape. I also have them paired with my Apple TV so if I feel inclined I can pull the rower into the downstairs media room/office and watch something on the TV while rowing.

The thing is, moving the rower is kind of a pain, and I never do it. Because of this, I started looking for a stand of some kind to hold my iPad and position it close enough to see the screen without hitting it as I rowed. Over a 6 month search I couldn’t find anything that I liked or that I thought would work. Then about a week ago I found RowFree, and I’m in love with this.

The RowFree Mount is a quickly installed bracket that can be used with Concept2 rowers, BikeERG, and SkiERG to hold electronic devices like tablets, smartphones, and laptops.  The RowFree Mount is highly adjustable and can be used to quickly position your device exactly where you need it. 

Constructed from aluminum alloy, the bracket is light and durable. The bracket simply slips over the PM5 on my Concept 2 and then adjusts to hold my device directly in my line of sight for the entire workout routine. I love this thing. It is simple, functional design at its finest. It’s not over-thought or overly complicated. It has a simple function and it works. It doesn’t block the readout on my PM5 and it makes rowing a whole lot more enjoyable.

RowFree is a small business located in Bend, Oregon.  Their mission is to provide the best way to interact with tablets, smartphones, and laptops while rowing. I think they nailed it.

The Digital Face of Healthcare.

It really is the 21st century. Take a look at how health care is transforming itself through technology, and how far it has come in just the last decade. The infographic below from MeMD highlights eight new innovative technologies that are transforming digital healthcare. In an attempt to reduce rising healthcare costs and improve patient care, digital health is emerging as a key driver in the transformation of healthcare. Organizations and payers are quickly integrating digital health tools for healthcare professionals and consumers. Healthcare insurance giant, Aetna recently launched their digital health and wellness platform, CarePass that features a growing catalog of more than 20 market-leading consumer apps, including iTriage, BodyMedia®, Fitbug®, UP by JawboneTM, LoseIt!, and Withings. It’ll be interesting to see where we are by 2023.

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Bottles, We Don’t Need No Ugly Water Bottles. Introducing Soma.

The best design is where form and function compliment each other in a way that is so seamless that the end user is doesn’t even notice it. Where a beautiful object has a very specific purpose, and form and function work so well together it blends unobtrusively into your life. Soma is a perfect example of that.

Constructed of Glass using a 100% compostable water filter Soma  is a beautiful object, one that is worthy of display. The filter blends into it’s container and becomes part of the complete design without giving away it’s true purpose.  the shape of the bottle is sexy and clean and wants to be held. And while the shape and look of Soma is important, the functional side of it is in many ways the most important part of all.

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The filter is designed by David Beeman – One of the top water filtration experts in the world.  Beeman brings over 30 years of experience in creating water filtration formulas for global brands like Starbucks, Peet’s, and others. The filter is made from all-natural Malaysian coconut shells, vegan silk, and food-based PLA plastic. The video explains it all with a solid Kickstarter pitch that is worth watching.

“We went on a hunt for materials that were compostable, healthy, and durable—not an easy task. Fortunately, we discovered three exceptional options. For the carbon granules that do most of the filtration, we identified all-natural Malaysian coconut shells. For the external casing we tracked down a food-based PLA composite that was surprisingly durable, even though it’s compostable. And, when it came to the final layer of filtration—which is typically done with a plastic screen, we came across a vegan silk from India. These materials were exactly what we were looking for. The Soma water filter is completely unique. There is nothing else like it in the world.” David Beeman

One more little point. How many plastic water bottles do you this could help remove from landfills, oceans, lakes, streams, rivers, and creeks? Just one more thing to think about.