Innovation

Razorfish Emerging Experiences’ “Flight Deck” for SFO.

Last week I was traveling through San Francisco International airport so I had the privilege of seeing this first hand. It’s pretty amazing in person and the photos do not do it justice. Razorfish has created an immersive experience that tries to recapture the golden age of travel, before jetliners became the Greyhound busses of the skies.

There are three total components to the entire experience; an interactive and real time large scale projection, the multi-touch kiosks, and the mobile  component. “Flight Deck” Featuring massive digital displays customers can see real-time flight information and updates, and interact with 6 touchscreen kiosks that feature interactive content about the San Francisco bay area, and the destinations the airport serves world wide.The entire service is connected to a mobile service allowing travelers to be connected even on the go.

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While the primary experience lives at Terminal 3, with the projected visualization functioning as a beacon calling on all SFO guests to contribute to the global SFO travel story, the total experience extends beyond SFO in the end. If you are traveling through San Francisco and have the time, I highly recommend stoping by to see this. For more info on Flight Deck, click here.

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Phrophets and iBeacon Extend the Museum Experience.

When Apple introduced iBeacon my first reaction was “Oh great yet another way to try and force feed me offers, coupons, and ads I don’t care about”. After seeing the way Prophets used the technology to extend the interaction of a museum experience my opinion has changed. The video below shows how Prophets working with the Rubens House Art Gallery in Antwerp created an extension of the museum experience by  using location based beacons that interact with visitors directly as they navigate the museum. As visitors pass by works of art, the beacons the tablet is sent a variety of interactive actions that stimulate and extend the viewing experience. The example is pretty straightforward, and shows the potential the technology has beyond simple advertising and offers.

Frameri Plans to Change Your Eyeglasses Experience.

As a designer that wears glasses I have always liked the idea of being able to switch my frames out depending on my mood. I have never understood why manufacturers and designers of frames have never done a modular design that allows you to quickly and easily update your frames. Actually I do get it, frames are expensive and they’d prefer you to spend loads of money on multiple pairs. That doesn’t mean I have to like the idea, or the business model.

Frameri is a start up that launched on indigogo earlier this week that plans to stand the whole glasses industry on it’s head. Their concept is simple, one set of lenses, many frames, loads of looks. They havecreated he world’s first interchangeable prescription frame and lens system. Based on the video below it looks like they have a winning idea, and one that could be just as lucrative as the current eyeglasses world. Frameri knows all too well how limiting one single pair of glasses can be to an ever evolving wardrobe, so they decided to give us options. The frames are hand made in Italy from Zyl acetates, and will be offered in a variety of colors, styles and patterns. In just 3 days, they have raised just under $18,000 of their $30,000 goal. Based on that I think Frameri is going to be a success.

With Tuls, You’re Never a Tool.

This new Kickstarter project from Dave & Calvin Laituri reminds me of my long ago days in graphic design and drafting when we used die cut templates to draw circles, ovals, arcs, curves, lines, boxes, and more. I think that nostalgia might be one of the reasons I like Tuls, but the reality is Tuls is a really nice design solution for people that need small tools which take up little space.

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Tuls are a set of compact, credit card-sized tools designed to solve a range of everyday problems. Tuls are bundled in functionally complimentary sets. They are small and flat enough to fit on your keychain or in your wallet. The thinking behind them is simple. Tuls are there for you in those times when you can’t reach the tool you wish you had. Each laser cut Tul is made from 18 gauge stainless steel or titanium, about as thick and rigid as a US dime; tough, durable and built to last.