Analog

Interactive / Analog Advertising in Peru.

Interactive goes analog with the launch of the new Abraxas beer ad in Lima magazine. Produced for SAB Miller by Wunderman Phantasia PERU, the ad is deceptively simple. Turn the flashlight on, on your phone, or just use a strong light source to reveal a secret message by suing the light through the back of the ad. I love this because it encourages you to use your smartphone, but requires no app, QR code, or any other digital device. Nice, simple, effective.

 

Toyota FCV “Turning Point” Teaser and Microsite.

Today Toyota quietly brought their new 2015 FCV (Fuel Cell Vehicle) to San Francisco  for a demo today. Along with it they launched a new micro site, and a fancy animated teaser video to go along with it. All of this came to my attention when I saw a couple of demo videos online  and did a search for the car. This is actually pretty exciting as far as I’m concerned. I know there are nay sayers , and folks that quickly dismiss the technology, but anything to get us away from fossil fuel use is fine by me. The car is only going to be available in California at first, but hopefully it will roll out on a national level soon.

The video below was produced by Brighton based  and Droga5 with post and animation done by London based, Analog. Following a brief that called for “simplicity, elegance, and sophistication, while ensuring strong storytelling and the human hand” The team pulled off a really refreshing way of marketing a very ubiquitous item. Yes it’s new technology, but its still a car. The team uses a line as a repeated motif and visual connector that leads the viewer through the spot that weaves through the visuals showing archaic fossil fuels, crumbling carbon cities, and emerging as a blue hydrogen highway that represents Toyota’s vision for the future of car propulsion. It’s a nice teaser and one that got me to actually go to the Toyota microsite and sign up for more information.

Kontor, “Back to Vinyl” Smartphone App.

In an ever increasing digital world bridging the gap between analog and digital can be tough. Coming up with a direct mail piece that grabs the attention of time starved creative directors can be just as hard if not more so. The video below actually dropped on YouTube back in May, but I just got an email about it last night from a friend. Kontor Records, the worlds largest dance label wanted to promote the new Boris Dlugosch to ad agencies.

Rather than send them a promo CD, or an email with a link to MP3 tracks on the album, they created “Back To Vinyl”, a physical record that you play with your smartphone. Housed in a well designed sleeve, that folds into a physical record player, “Back To Vinyl” generated some impressive results for a direct marketing piece. It actually got 71% of the recipients to scan the QR code and activate the player. From that they got a 42% click through rate to the Kontor online store. Not bad at all for direct mail.

Pencil Light, by Caroline Olsson.

Caroline Olsson’s Pencil Light is a lamp and a container. Something about it vaguely reminds me of the main character in Wall-e, or Luxo Jr. but that doesn’t bother me one bit. The purpose of the lamp is to ” accentuate your stationery, and has the desire to encourage you to write and draw more analog.” according to the designer. I can relate to this, since my day job is working as a designer for a company that produces ink on paper products.

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The lamp is made from birch wood, and features copper and brass screw mechanisms that allow the light to be adjusted to a variety of positions. The box below functions as a container for your writing and drawing implements of choice, and when not in use the light can be closed to hide everything.

Materials: birch, aluminium, steel, copper, copper and brass.
Light: LED bulb.

Photographer: Kaja Bruskeland

Shooting Analog, and Drinking Wine.

Back in December I bought a 35-year-old Olympus OM2 35mm film camera and a bunch of lenses on eBay. I shot a single roll of film to test out the meter, shutter, and body for typical things like light leaks and exposure accuracy. After shooting my first roll of film in about 15 years, I took it in for developing and promptly forgot about it for 3 months. Today, I was at Crick and remembered to pick up the disc and check out the images I shot back in December. So how’d the camera do? better than I expected, considering there were a number of adult libations consumed while testing it out.

The images below are the result of an evening of good friends, dinner, wine, the holidays, and an impending winter storm.

004_3 013_12 034_33 018_17 010_9 014_13 011_10 012_11 002_1

I’m Lusting ILLOT this Friday Afternoon.

I have a thing for retro styled digital cameras. Its one of the things that attracted me to the Olympus EP and OMD series cameras. I don’t have a thing for film anymore. I have moved fully into the digital camp and this is where I’ll stay. That doesn’t mean that I don’t have a soft spot for retro film cameras though. Especially cameras like the ones that are being done up by ILOTT Vintage.

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ILOTT collects and restore select vintage rangefinder cameras taking great care, time and pride in refurbishing each camera that they acquire.The cameras are put through a series of rigorous tests to ensure that they are field ready before being sold.

Taking the cameras to a new level, ILOTT replaces leather body coverings with premium quality wood veneers tailored to each camera for a unique vintage appearance. Since no two cameras ILOTT creates are exactly the same, they continue to restore cameras rather than rely on the collection they already have on hand.The cameras are wrapped in Mansonia, or Mahogany which is applied by hand after the camera has been restored. I love the Argus C3, but I have to say the Mahogany Canonet QL 17 has me all lusty this afternoon.

“We love the mystery of not knowing where the cameras have been before, who has used them and what photos they might have taken.”

Monday Morning Inspiration. “The Watchmaker” by Dustin Cohen.

I work with pixels, with digital content on a daily basis. The things I create have no physical form, they are simply a display of numbers represented as images on a screen. This doesn’t diminish the creativity that goes into what I do, but over the years it has made me yearn for things made by hand. When I started my career as a designer, everything was done by hand. Even the photo processes used to create a printed page was analog. That longing for the mechanical, the analog, the hands on, has led me in recent years to a greater appreciation of finely crafted items, especially things like watches, clocks, vintage radios and stereo gear, etc.

Last night while perusing the “Made in Brooklyn” series on Vimeo I came across “The Watchmaker”. This is a short film by Dustin Cohen about David Sokosh, a watch maker in Brooklyn New York. Cohen’s short film captures that feeling about the hands on craftsmanship that surrounds the creation of a fine time piece. It captures Sokosh’s passion, and patience that is needed to produce a bespoke Brooklyn Watch. Perhaps it is my longing to spend time creating with my hands instead of a computer that drew me to this film. Then again it could also be the masterful way the short film was shot and edited.

The ironic part is, the film is all pixels, and I am equally drawn to the pixel craft went into making this film.

Be sure and check out the photo essay about the film here.