Bourbon

A Fist Full of Bourbon

As a bourbon drinker, this brand had me at the name. Scotch whisky maker William Grant is jumping into the bourbon market with new brand “Fistful of Bourbon”. To kick off the launch they teamed up with Quaker City Mercantile and Saturday Night Live director Paul Briganti, and Tool of North America to produce a tongue in cheek play on a classic spaghetti western and the results are so good.

The spot imagines two cowboys waxing poetic about the use of sunscreen, reading Gwyneth Paltrow’s blog Goop, silk pajamas and more. The writing is fun, and the two main actors set the mood. The only thing they need is a Ennio Moriccone soundtrack and some overdubbed voices on the supporting cast.

Taking full advantage of YouTube, Briganti pushes this to 2 minutes in length allowing for more absurdity. It almost seems to go a on a bit long with some sight gags in the bar scene being overplayed, but for the most part it works. At least it did for me, doing exactly what advertising is supposed to do. Hook you, hold you, keep you engaged, remember the product, and the brand.

How About Bourbon Cherry Seltzer’s for the 4th?

Nothing says patriotism like blowing things up while you consume alcoholic beverages. While beer is probably the number one choice of booze to drink on the Fourth of July, some of us might prefer something a bit different. Perhaps a Bourbon Cherry Seltzer. The recipe sounds more difficult than it is, and the results are definitely worth your time to make it.

Booze

For New Year’s, the Ritz Old Fashioned.

It’s New Year’s Eve, and that calls for cocktails. Tasty tasty cocktails made with fine spirits, and the delicate touch of a well trained mixologist. For this years New Year’s cocktail endeavor, I’ve decided to try a new take on an old standard. The Ritz Old Fashioned. This is really a basic Old Fashioned with a few extra ingredients to give it some extra snap. As always, the better the booze, the better the taste. You can substitute any of the brands here, but I’m sticking with the good stuff.

2 oz Woodford Reserve bourbon whiskey
2/3 oz Grand Marnier orange liqueur
1 tsp Luxardo maraschino liqueur
1 tsp lemon juice
1 tsp egg white
1 large sugar cube
1 dash Fee Brothers Orange bitters
1 oz soda water
2 Griottenes Brandy Infused Cherries
1 Orange slice
1 Lemon Slice
Sugar in a saucer for the glass rim.

Rim an old-fashioned glass with lemon juice and sugar.
Place a teaspoon-sized sugar cube into the glass, and saturate with Fee Brother’s Orange bitters.
Fill the glass three-quarters of the way with chipped ice. (Medium sized cubes will work)
Shake other ingredients (except soda) and strain into the glass.
Top with a small amount of soda water if desired.
Add two Griottenes Brandy Infused Cherries on a cocktail skewer, with half slices of orange and lemon.
Drink.

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Mmmmm I’ll Have Another “Ward 8” Please.

A while back I installed an app on my iPhone that has about a million cocktail recipes in it. While I know I’ll never try them all, there are some that I find rather intriguing and will have to add to my list of adult libation staples.

One of the newer drinks that I have become fascinated with is th “Ward 8” cocktail. The Ward 8 originated in Boston in 1898 at the Gilded Age bar Locke-Ober.

According to Wikipedia

“In 1898 Democratic political czar Martin M. Lomasney hoped to capture a seat in the state’s legislature, the General Court of Massachusetts. Lomasney held considerable power in the city for nearly 50 years. The story goes that the drink was created to honor his election, and the city’s Ward 8 which historically delivered him a winning margin. Competing, but unfounded myths abound in print and on the Internet. One story purports that it originated in New York in an area known for political corruption, another that the cocktail is a traditional drink of the Scottish Guards.”

The Locke-Ober was closed in 1919 at the start of prohibition, but re-opened in 1933, So there are several variations of the Ward 8 cocktail. Various recipes call for blended whiskey, bourbon, rye, or even single malt scotch. Some recipes call for lemon juice, lime juice, no juice, grenadine, sour mix, and something called gomme syrup.

When Locke-Ober reopened its bar in 1933 it began using this recipe:

  • 2 ounces rye whiskey
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce fresh orange juice
  • 1 teaspoon grenadine
  • Maraschino cherry (optional)

Shake the rye whiskey, lemon juice, orange juice, and grenadine with ice; then strain into a chilled cocktail glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry, if desired. Originally the drink was decorated with a small paper Massachusetts flag.