Brand

Jones Knowles Ritchie Burger King Rebrand

When you are asked to rebrand any company or organization it is not something that can be executed quickly. There is quite a bit of strategy that goes into the process, especially when you are rebranding a higher profile, internationally known company. Jones Knowles Ritchie was charged with rebranding Burger King and I have to say the results are fantastic. Everything from billboards to employee uniforms has a distinct and cohesive flair that, in my opinion, gives a nod to the design styling of the late 1970s.

From a strategic point, JKR in collaboration with Burger King set out together to bring to life what Burger King’s commitment is to the food, free from colors, preservatives, and flavors from artificial sources. They wanted to use design to help close the gap between the negative perceptions a lot of people have of fast food, and the positive reality of Burger King’s food story by making the brand feel less synthetic, artificial, cheap, and more real. To put it simply, JKR makes the Burger King Brand and the food even more crave-able.

The typography, illustrations, color pallet, copy-writing, all of it has a strong cohesive voice that differentiates itself from the competition. What will be interesting to see is if Burger King continues to use any of their past advertising that focused on the King and had at times an almost surreal approach in terms of content. In the past, Burger King has been known for off-the-wall campaigns like Subservient Chicken. This is light-years away from that approach.

For Burger King’s first global rebrand in more than two decades, we set out to make the brand feel less synthetic and artificial, and more real, crave-able, and tasty. We were inspired by the brand’s original logo and how it has grown to have an iconic place in culture. The new logo pays homage to the brand’s heritage with a refined design that’s confident, simple, and fun.

JKR Global

Samsung Unpacks 36 Million Viral Views on YouTube.

The power of viral. The video below dropped less than a week ago on YouTube and it already has more than 36 million views. No it doesn’t use some magic formula, and no it wasn’t lucky. It went viral because it plays off of the genre of “unboxing” videos that are all over the internet, and because the production value of the video is rock solid. When combined with the Samsung brand, the nostalgia that surrounds some vintage tech, and the possibility that you might see some piece of unreleased gear, things get a bit nutty.

“From the release of the SH-100 mobile phone in 1988 to the first wristwatch phone. The World’s smallest TV phone to our first MP3 phone. We introduced the S Pen with the Galaxy Note series and paved the way for Phablets. We’ve even climbed mountains to make the first 3G call from Everest. Gone underwater to test the ability of the Galaxy S5 and curved glass to create the first dual edge screen smartphone.

Wherever there’s a barrier, we see it as an invitation to go further, together.

Who knows where progress will take us.”

Brazen.

In 2013 a group of artists, animators, scientists, writers, designers, producers, and marketers formed Brazen Animation with one purpose. “In a world saturated with “Throw Away Entertainment” we have only one goal: to tell inspirational stories with meaning and purpose.” To achieve that goal, they work on commercials while they develop their own feature projects. The video below is a fabulous example of the quality of the animated work they produce. It features “Iggy” who represents the Brazen spirit within each of us that is passionate, bold, unique, accountable, autonomous, collaborative, and classy.

How It’s Made. Triada Studios & Shoghakat TV.

Most of us take for granted the amount of work that goes into a 15 or 30 second TV commercial or promo. The 4 videos below from Armenian Triada Studio is a great example of what I am talking about. The first two spots show the final rebrands for Shoghakat TV. The second 2 show the amount of compositing, green screen, 3D, VFX, color grading and additional post work needed to make these spots pop. This is some really nice work, that probably goes unnoticed by most people.