Canon

70,000 Shots = 1, 365 Gigapixel Image.

OK this is just crazy. The video below shows the behind the scenes. The image below is a panorama compiled from 70,oo0 single shots.

Pano 2

Shooting for 15 days and taking 2 months to complete the 365 gigapixel image is described as the world’s highest definition panoramic photograph. The images were shot on a Canon 70D with a 400 mm lens and a 2x tele-converter.

The project is titled in2white and was led by Italian photographers Filippo Blengini and Alessandra Bacchilega, which took their team to an altitude of 11,482ft to make this happen. Working in freezing temperatures the managed to create an epic image of the Italian Alps and the surrounding landscape. In order to pull this off the programmed a Clauss precision pan-and-tilt head which was able to accurately position to create the seamless image below. For the full experience go to the website here.

Friday Inspiration, Travel Love.

I need a vacation, an overseas foreign land vacation to be specific. Since the trip to Italy fell through earlier this year it might be a while before I travel abroad again. In order to get my travel fix I guess I’ll watch videos like the one below from Christian Grewe.

This five-minute short is a highlight reel of three separate trips to Asia, Thailand, and South America. All of the footage was shot his Canon 5 D Mark II and III, plus a GoPro Black edition. These feature really nice travel footage, that reinforce the fact that you really need to look around, be adventurous, and pay attention when traveling. Why? Because if you don’t you might miss the little things, and the little things make it all worthwhile.

A Super Cell Thunderstorm in Texas.

Summer is almost upon us, and Kansas City feels like a hot sticky mess outside. It’s 92 degrees and I think the humidity is the same. All of this adds up to ripe conditions for thunderstorms. The video below is a time-lapse captured by Arizona native Mike Oblinski near Booker Texas on June 3rd, 2013. The video was shot on his trusty Canon 5D with a 14mm Rokinon f2.8 lens. The video shows the super cell thunderstorm as it develops and changes over time becoming more and more powerful.

Sunrise Over Kansas

This weekend marked the start of a new film project. This image was taken as the sun rose over Kansas this morning, following a full day of shooting.

The project will take about 12 months to complete, and updates will be posted along the way. Look for a Vimeo teaser in the next week or so, followed by style boards, storyboards, behind the scenes info and other details.

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“The Lion City”. A Time Lapse Video of Signapore.

When tilt shift video is done right it looks amazing. Here is a short time lapse video from  entitled “The Lion City”. The film was shot in Singapore, and does an amazing job of capturing the architecture, and bustling transportation the city is known for.   The video was shot on Nikon and Canon HDSLRs  with a moderate sized crew. If you get a chance, take the time to watch his other tilt shift films. Keith Loutit has the technique down, and the final results are worth watching.

The Olympus OMD vs Canon 5D MkII at Greaserama 2012.

A couple of Sunday’s back my friend Tim and I took his Canon 5D MkII and my Olympus OMD EM-5 to Kansas City’s Greaserama hot rod show that takes place every memorial day weekend at the Boulevard Drive-In. Aside from shooting video of some pretty amazing rat rods, hot rods, and vintage bikes, we wanted to do another comparison between the cameras.

The video below was shot all hand held with no steady rigs, or other camera mounts. Like the video from the Kauffman Preorming Arts Center, this is a mix of footage from both cameras. The 5D was stabilized with Adobe After Effects using the Warp Stabilizer. The Olympus used the 5 axis image stabilization built into it with just a few of those clips getting the Warp Stabilizer.

There are a couple of things that bug me about some of the Olympus footage. When the camera is not in manual focus mode, it tends to shift focus when tracking a moving object. The shift is subtle but there on some of the clips. Overall though, I think the OMD EM-5 holds it’s own with the 5D MkII, and beats it for in camera image stabilization.

Olympus OMD EM-5 + Canon 5D MkII + After Effects + a Stunning Piece of Architecture = Impressive.

Yesterday morning my friend Tim and I went down to the amazing Kauffman Preforming Arts Center in Kansas City to shoot some test footage with the Olympus OMD EM-5. In the process Tim shot footage with his Canon 5D Mk II, and the idea of doing a little comparison was born.

All the footage in the video below was hand held. Both cameras were shooting at 1080p with the same ISO, frame rates, and exposure settings. What you will see is there is some camera shake. Its inherent in hand held footage without a steady rig of some kind. What you will also see is how well the OMD’s 5 axis image stabilization system works.

All of the 5D footage was stabilized in post using After Effects Warp Stabilizer. Less than half of the OMD EM-5’s footage was.The Warp Stabilizer was used to reduce camera shake, and to eliminate rolling shutter in some of the horizontal pans across the building.

Now can you tell which footage is from the Canon 5D MkII, and which is from the Olympus OMD EM-5?