CGI

BETC Rebuilds The World With Lego and Some Help from Traktor

For the first time since the 1980s, Lego has unveiled its first brand campaign. Produced by the French agency BETC in conjunction with multi-award winning collective Traktor the project titled Rebuild the World features a live-action film and micro-site designed to send a positive political message about the power of creativity to enable change.

BETC met Lego 18 months ago and worked with the brand’s internal agency to develop the concept, Rebuild the World. “We thought about what would be important for Lego to say today,” said BETC founder Rémi Babinet. “They are one of the most loved brands in the world, no one argues with Lego! It’s like Apple in the beginning; innovation and creativity are both brand and philosophy. That’s rare in the commercial world. The problem it has is that while it is known for the educational aspect of Lego, that perception is a problem for all the parents who don’t have an affinity with the brand. They think it’s about following instructions. But it’s more than play or education – it’s about creativity. To be creative today is the way to achieve something, to navigate the new world. Mathematics and rationality used to be the most important skills, but now creativity is the most valuable skill, and Lego can enable that.”

The tagline “Rebuild the World” resonates beyond Lego itself, to chime with the issues of the contemporary world. 

It is a tag line that everyone can relate to when associating it with the Lego brand.

In keeping with the campaign message, the video goes against expectations by not featuring a single Lego brick. Instead, it is a live-action and CGI adventure caper that sees a rabbit chased by a hunter with a bow and arrow, overcoming every challenge thrown at him with increasingly creative solutions. This was inspired by Lego’s ethos for problem-solving. BETC chose to go down the live-action route because, as Rémi states, “When you are in the head of a child, the bricks become the real world, the world they create with Lego is a real story for them.”

Rebuild the World Micro-Site

Every tiny detail of the film has been considered to reflect the Lego universe and its billions of fans. In the town of Valparaíso in Chile, buildings were repainted to match Lego brick colors. Clothes worn by all the characters in the video are 2D printed like Lego characters. If you look at the bad guy, his shirt, tie, jacket, and binoculars are all printed onto one T-shirt. 

The cars and trees match the cars and trees of a Lego kit. The people bend backward at the hip or turn their head around just like Lego people do. Every scene features a builder to reference the iconic Lego figurine. At one point, a line of ducks crosses the road, which references Lego’s first-ever product. Even the props, such as the camera, cups and the bow and arrow, are made to scale, oversized like Lego accessories.

“There were no limits,” Rémi says. “Lego was a cool brand to work with. It was an opportunity to find things you can never do with other brands. So this film is about what your imagination can do with Lego.”

For all the out-of-home imagery and animated vignettes, which will roll out globally on billboards from London to Los Angeles, BETC did use Lego bricks, shot by photographers who are used to working on luxury brand campaigns – “We wanted to capture the incredible beauty of the bricks. These images subvert stereotypes, challenge expectations, and at times send political messages. They are simple ideas, but often at a societal level. Rebuild the world could be just for fun, or it could address issues in the world today. You can transform the world as you want. It’s not a political campaign. You could go far with these messages, we tried lots of things… but this is a balance between meaningful and fun. It’s conscious, but in the end, it’s only about kids.” – Rémi Babinet.

The entire campaign is reinforced with a solid micro-site, social media, print, and outdoor campaigns. As we roll into the holiday season, it’ll be interesting to see the shorter 30-second broadcast versions of the ad plus any additional online vignette videos that are produced to bolster the entire campaign.

Coldplay’s Up&Up is a visual treat.

I’m not really a Coldplay fan, but I have to give them credit for the video below. Actually I have to give credit to directors Vania Heymann and Gal Muggia plus their crew that produced it. Coldplay just stars in it. This is a wonderful blend of vintage film, green screen work, CGI, compositing, and animation. If you love Coldplay, turn up the volume and sing along. If you don’t turn off the sound and just watch the visuals. They are pretty captivating, and engaging. In the Vimeo credits, there is a list of artists that inspired the visuals. I have pasted them below the video. Oh, and if you are curious about how many people were involved in making this, click through to Vimeo and take a look at the crew involved.

Inspired by the art of:
Victoria Siemer, Sammy Slabbinck, Karen Lynch, Sarah Eisenlohr, Joe Webb, Jeff Hendrickson, Katie Dutch, Linder Sterling, Kieron “cur3es” Cropper, Beth Hoeckel, Eugenia Loli, Mariano Peccinetti, Shang Chengxiang, Charlie Davoli, Artem Rhads Cheboha, Fran Rodriguez, Felipe Posada, Jay Riggio, Ser Sinestésico, Marina Molares, Merve Ozaslan, Julien Pacaud, Angelo Vazquez, Terry Ringler, Djuno Tomsni, John Stezaker, Richard Hamilton, Hannah Höch, and of course Rene Magritte.

Free Fallin’ with NVIDIA’s Shield.

The purpose of advertising is to get you to do something. Buy it, click on it, engage with it, remember it etc. The video below form NVIDIA got me to do a couple of those things. I’m going to remember the brand, I clicked through to find out more about the product, and the ad kept me engaged all the way to the end when I got the pay off. With that said I have to admit I was confused for most of this spot. Intrigued, but confused. I saw product placement throughout, but I actually thought this was for a new Xbox. Why? because this was sent to me, and I took it out of context from the NVIDIA YouTube Channel.

For a company that has built it’s brand on building video cards for gaming computers, and CGI workstations I am now left wondering how much of this is real, and how much is CGI. I know the cat didn’t actually go with him. I know it looks like the real deal, except I kept wondering how they kept the platform level for so much of the free fall. It doesn’t matter I guess. I clicked through to the NVIDIA Shield site to check things out and find out more about the product, which by the way, doesn’t offer anything so unique that I would switch from using my Apple TV and Airplay to sling content from my iPad and Macbook to the TV screen.

It’s still a fun add and website though. And for the record, the more I watch this, the more I think it’s real footage.

 

Welcome to Firefox and the Making of.

This spot for Firefox cold have been done with 3D animation and other CGI tricks but it wasn’t. There is something very refreshing about the number of spots I am seeing that are live action shoots enhanced with some rock solid post work. The two videos below show the finished piece by  and the making of video, which shows just how much hand work went into the crafting of this 60 second spot.

The Droste Effect – Honda CRV

To introduce the new Honda CRV director Chris Palmer and Glassworks Creative Director Jordi Bares worked to create the first endless commercial playing off of an optical illusion called the “Droste Effect” which creates an endless visual loop. Taking more than 126 previs attempts using 3D modeling, Glassworks opted to  build an actual set and shoot the spot live, blending the final results with CGI components. In addition to the TV spot, there is a YouTube channel that locates your position on the planet and serves up a rendering of the commercial that mirrors the time of day, weather conditions, and knows your location. In addition, you can navigate to other cities around the world to see what the conditions are like there. This is really, really nice work tying together digital and broadcast components into a hypnotic and engaging promotion. Both the making of, and the finished video are below.

A Colorless World Brought to you by Dulux.

UK paint company Dulux has released a new TV spot where the world is a colorless environment that reminds me of some Orwellian future world. According to a study that Dulux commissioned, the United Kingdom is “sleepwalking into a colorless future, with color gradually draining out of all elements of life.” I don’t really see that, but it makes for a great ad.

BBH London and director Daniel Wolfe teamed up with London based Glassworks to produce the spot which in the behind the scenes videos you’ll see was a massive undertaking. The spot is really well produced and feels like the trailer to a Hollywood blockbuster. The behind the scenes stuff though is really fascinating, and sheds light on the production that went into making this all come together.

Fine Living, Animated by BDA and Studio Hansa.

When BDA Creative won the pitch to develop the rebrand for the factual lifestyle channel Fine Living, they had strict budgetary constraints. The result is a series of idents that are totally CGI. By going with full CGI instead of shooting live in a multitude of locations they were able to develop  smartly designed spaces that could be international and aspirational.

Working with London’s Studio Hansa, BDA used distinct colors that reflect the five key areas of interest that Fine Living embodies. Red for Cuisine, yellow for Well-being, blue for Travel, pink for Style and green for Home. Each ident focuses attention on both the Fine Living logo as well as the animated components that reinforce the brand and place them squarely at the center of the Fine Living universe. The result is a series of fluid animations where it is hard to believe that everything in each shot is an animated 3D model. This is really nice work from both teams.

FL