Coffee

Hand Pressed Espresso

There is a scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s “To Catch a Thief” where Grace Kelly, and Cary Grant stop for a picnic lunch of fried chicken and beers after eluding the police in the south of France. There is a romantic nostalgia about it that has always drawn me in. Not because of the picnic thing, although if Grace Kelly had asked me to go for a drive in her metallic blue 1953 Sunbeam Alpine Mk I and stop for a picnic, I wouldn’t have said no. I’m not sure where the feeling of nostalgia comes from, maybe it’s the idea of a leisurely way to spend time your best gal, and enjoy the countryside in the South of France. Ok I’m getting lost in my thoughts here. What got me going on this tangent was an email I got this morning for the Handpresso Complete Outdoor Kit. Seeing the machine in it’s carrying case along with cups, and napkins got me to thinking about two things. First the scene in “To Catch a Thief”. Second, wouldn’t it be awesome to have an espresso while

What got me going on this tangent was an email I got this morning for the Handpresso Complete Outdoor Kit. Seeing the machine in it’s carrying case along with cups, and napkins got me to thinking about two things. First the scene in “To Catch a Thief”. Second, wouldn’t it be awesome to have an espresso while hiking in the woods? OK the second thought is a lie. I’m not going to lug this up the mountain so I can have an espresso on the trail. I’m more likely to hike up and down the mountain and stop at the coffee place in town for a cup while I rest my feet and review the photos I took. I do like this thing though, and I kind of want it even though I have no practical reason for it.

From a design perspective, this is a thing of beauty. From the themo-molded EVA case to the cups, what is there not to like about the look of this? Even the Handpresso machine is a stylish little device capable of delivering a creamy espresso with 16 bars of pressure.

Handpresso was established in Fontainebleau, 55 km south of Paris which might be the reason it made me think of “To Catch a Thief”.

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The Look Of This Espresso Machine Slays Me.

I love a good espresso, and I love good industrial design, and when you put the two together you get the latest creation from Slayer. Almost 10 years after launching, the Slayer Steam is one beautiful piece of coffee making hardware, and I am seriously lusting after this right now. This is seriously a stunning piece of coffee making hardware. I think I might be afraid to use it because I wouldn’t want it to get all smudged and dirty. All that stainless steel, and turned wood… Love.

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Almost 10 years in to the Slayer story, were sharing the biggest news since our launch. We invite you to experience the second machine series in our growing catalog. This is Slayer Steam. SLAYER STEAM Our pursuit of flavor potential began with Slayer Espresso and the technology that we developed in 2007.

Today, we continue to provoke innovation with a completely new machine, a second series that gives you the ability to transform your milk game and focus on a quality-driven, high-volume business. EVOLVING MILK Slayer Steam is our answer to the unasked, yet crucial, questions about steaming milk. With exclusive technology, baristas take control of steam temperature and flow rate, ultimately improving flavor in the milk beverages ordered by the majority of their customers.

UNLOCKED POTENTIAL

The Vaporizer is a compact super-heater that boosts the temperature of steam and creates a dry, invisible vapor. By simultaneously increasing temperature and decreasing dilution, Slayer Steam promotes full flavor development in all milk varieties. Even low-fat dairy and alternative milks display extraordinary gloss, sweetness, and complexity when heated with the Vaporizer.

TAKE COMPLETE CONTROL

Multiple actuation stages add a new level of customization and efficiency. Accu-Flow steam actuators feature two positions per wand, each with programmable presets for temperature and flow rate. Now, every session can be personalized for the preparation of a specific beverage. Reserving one setting for restricted flow makes it even easier to steam small volumes of milk for macchiatos and cortados.

MASTERY WITHIN REACH

Steam is designed to produce excellent milk drinks for high-volume business and is our first machine with automatic-volumetric operation. Shot volumes, brew temperatures, and steam settings are quickly adjusted in the digital Barista Dashboard. New brew actuators offer access to two volumetric doses, in concert with shot timers. An adjustable-height drip tray provides 50% more workspace than most espresso machines. Every interactive element has been optimized for efficiency.

These features, combined with many considerations for workflow, ergonomics, and durability, make Slayer Steam the most efficient espresso machine on the market and the top performer for businesses that rely on milk drinks as a major revenue stream.

Slayer Research and Development is led by CEO and Founder Jason Prefontaine, Industrial Designer Chris Flechtner, and Product Development Engineer Devin Walker, three innovators who have helped to define our roots from the very beginning. Slayer Steam is the result of a creative collaboration between this team and many talented friends in the industry. From everyone involved, we cant wait to see what you do with this machine.

 

The Beauty of Coffee by Ratio.

Mark Hellweg took his passion for design, good tools, architecture, and aesthetics and put it to good use when he launched Ratio. The fruits of his labors is this absolutely stunning coffee maker.

Ratio is a high-design machine that is built around the precise science of brewing the perfect cup of coffee. Beneath it’s beautiful exterior is a powerful heating element that maintains an constant optimal brewing temperature of 200 degrees so coffee is never to hot or to cold.

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Ratio is designed manufactured and assembled by hand in Portland Oregon. The materials used are a reflection of Hellweg’s attention to detail, and his love of design. Die cast nickel-plated aluminum contrasts with Oregon black walnut and borosilicate glass.

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Portland Press. A French Press in Mason Jar.

Sitting in Estes Park this morning while drinking a cup of vacation coffee, and surfing the internet I came across this French press coffee maker from Portland Press. Designed and made in Portland Oregon from all natural materials, Portland Press wanted to create something that would improve your coffee making experiences with quality materials as nice as the coffee you’re drinking.

The Portland Press is a french press designed to work with a Mason jar, out of materials sourced in the USA. This is a simple, clean, practical design made out of basic materials like: glass, wool, steel, and wood. Oh one nice thing, if the Mason jar is easy to replace if it breaks, and the rest of the Portland Press is backed with a lifetime warranty.

STANDERT a Coffee Loving Cycling Dream.

Having recently moved to a loft downtown, I am getting acquainted with the new building. One thing I am very aware of is the office/retail space that is currently vacant on the first floor. Since our building sits right next the footbridge that leads to bike trails, I was thinking it would be a perfect space for a bike shop. A friend of mine said it would be the perfect spot for a bike shop/coffee shop, and I can’t agree more. This got me to thinking about what that would look like, which led to me searching the web for similar spaces. What did I find? I found plenty, but one that stood out was Standert in Berlin.

This small footprint shop is located at Invalidenstraße 157 · 10115 Berlin. The small shop features full service bike service, sales, repairs, and equipment, plus a full service coffee and other tasty beverages. From the look of the photos, this is the kind of place I could seriously spend some time in. The cafe menu includes the cyclist beer Velosophe, as well as pastries, soups, bagels, homemade popsicles, coffee, tea, and a variety of espresso drinks.

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Have Your Coffee and Eat It Too.

20130112-101737.jpgFor the last couple of days I’ve been dealing with some sort of sinus/flu thing. The one thing it and my meds have done is take away any form of taste. I’m talking about physical taste, the kind you get from your tongue. This morning I made coffee and thanks to my medicine it has fabulous metallic quality to it. I can’t wait until I can taste a full body espresso, with a fabulous crema.

All this coffee talk leads me to this, the “Cookie Cup” from Venezuelan designer Enrique Luis is an edible Cookie Cup for Italian coffee company Lavazza. The cookie cup is made of pastry that is covered with a special icing sugar that works as an insulator making the cup waterproof and sweetening at the same time. Pretty ingenious design if you ask me.

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Espresso, Vertigo, Go.

Yesterday morning I suffered a massive vertigo attack. I’ve never had it before, and I hope I never have it again. Here it is 36 hours later, and I’m still dizzy with occasional waves of nausea. One of the side effects of vertigo comes from the meds they give you. That side effect is “drowsiness”, and like the dizziness it sucks.

What better way to overcome drowsiness than a fine cup of espresso, and what a better way to serve it up than with a fine espresso machine like this one designed by Arvid Hauser.

The espresso machine is wall mounted, and manufactured from porcelain and wood. The wall mount helps free up kitchen counter space, and the exposed components “make the coffee preparation process comprehensible for the user”.  I just like the sculptural quality of the espresso machine and the natural materials used to construct it.

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