Color Film

Unity Gaming Engine’s “Adam”.

Modern film making is less than 100 years old. Think about this, the first movie with synced sound is 89 years old. The first feature length color motion picture dates to 1914. In 102 years the industry has seen massive changes in technology and the way film making is created. Looking to the future you have to think about how gaming works, realistic images get rendered on screen in real-time with real world dynamics.

Recently Unity showed a demo of what the future might hold for the film industry. Not all of it, but definitely some of it. Using just $3000.00 of hardware, running Unity’s gaming engine, they rendered out the video below to a live audience in real-time. The quality is pretty damn amazing especially when you think back to what gaming was like just ten years ago.

Unity’s film The is ADAM, and it’s a multi-part series to be released over the course of the next few months. Each segment is being developed to test each beta release of the Unity gaming engine and additional features, quality, and improved render capabilities. It is all part of a way to demo the new Unity 5.4 and the cinematic sequencer currently being developed, along with an experiments in implementing of real-time believable volumetric area lighting. The Unity demo shows off the physics simulation tool CaronteFX and the quality of the natural physics it produces.

Pretty impressive stuff. The full length short will be shown at Unite Europe 2016 in Amsterdam.

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London Then and Now. A Project from Simon Smith and Claude Friese-Greene.

Here is a rather interesting post from Vimeo for Monday. In 1927 cinematographer Claude Friese-Greene, inventor of the Friese-Greene Color process for film cameras traveled to London and shot some extraordinary silent footage of the city. In 2013, as a personal project   has attempted to recreate each of Friese-Greene’s shots. It’s pretty amazing to look at the split screen and see not only how much the city has changed, but how much of it has remained the same.

“During the 1920s, cinematographer Claude Friese-Greene travelled across the UK with his new colour film camera. His trip ended in London, with some of his most stunning images, and these were recently revived and restored by the BFI, and shared across social media and video websites.

Since February I have attempted to capture every one of his shots, standing in his footsteps, and using modern equivalents of his camera and lenses. This has been a personal study, that has revealed how little London has changed.”