Commercial

“Dominoes”, No I Don’t Mean Pizza.

Power house video effects and production company Imaginary Forces have created a new spot to introduce the new Toyota fuel cell vehicle. The spot is deceptively simple, which is why I have posted the behind the scenes video first. This shows a great example of blending live action with CG effects using some very sophisticated motion control cameras. One of the things I like about the making of / behind the scenes video is the fact that they talk about the concept as much as the production. They could have just shown how the commercial was shot, but the tech is only one leg of the chair. How Imaginary Forces ties the creative, and storytelling component in is equally compelling. It’s a simple idea on the surface with many complex layers underneath.

Grey and 1st Ave. Machine’s “Piano” for Gillette.

In terms of clever advertising, Grey and1st Ave Machine got it right on with this spot for Gillette. This is a really nice way to do a product demo, and totally memorable. The crew rigged up 88 of Gillette’s new Flex Ball razors to piano keys, tied them to a matrix which ran to an alternate keyboard played by composer Son Lux. Lux plays a an elegant composition as the camera moves throgh various angles, details and close ups of the product. This is some really nice work that goes way outside the box for advertising a razor and blades.

Apple’s New Perspective.

Below is the new two and a half minute online spot for Apple. If you are not one of the 750,000 people that have already seen it, you are in for a treat. The video features tons of forced perspective, optical illusions, a little animated type, and one hell of a script. As always, Apple advertising is a total winner.

“Live The Language.”

Produced at New Land Directed by Gustav Johansson, this spot for EF International Language Centers takes you on a fifty year journey across continents, through fashion and technology trends, and shows how learning a new language has changed over the years. The learning component is subtle, and takes a bit before it really sinks in, but when it does the message resonates. The commercial has a really nice look to it moving from vintage to current without feeling forced. The look of the spot feels right through out. The vintage color grading and post treatment work because you are being taken on a journey across a period of time, rather then being something added because it is a current trend, or in-style fashion. One of the things that I love about this spot is that there is hardly any dialog spoken, and it uses a series of supers to effectively tell the story and help transition the viewer across the five decades. Really nice work.

Directed by Gustav Johansson
D.O.P: Evan Prosofsky
Typography: Albin Holmqvist