Design Engineering

Henry Wang and Chris Curro Reinvent the Cardboard Box.

This is probably old news, although I just came across this today. I say old news because the YouTube video already has 3.5 million views, none the less this is a great idea from two students at Cooper Union’s Invention Factory. The premise is quite simple, build a better shipping box that uses less paper, recycles easier, and can be assembled and shipped without tape. The video below shows it in action. Deceptively simple, simply ingenious. I hope these two land their patent, licenseĀ this out to USPS, FedEx, and UPS, and get rich so they can invent more stuff.

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The Fastest Car in the World. MG’s EX181.

When you think of the British car company MG, most people think of classic sports cars like the MG B, MG midget, or more recently the TF which was introduced in the early 2000’s. the reality is that MG designed and built a full range of sedans and mid sized cars. As always, MG cars were beautiful examples of automotive design, and innovation. Like many British cars built by MG they were also temperamental. (I know this from the first hand experience of owning an MG many years ago) One thing that most people probably don’t know, is MG built a custom made land speed record holder in 1957. A car custom built to be driven by Sterling Moss to a top speed of 245 mph at the Bonneville Salt Flats.

The MG EX181 was a bespoke automobile with one purpose; Go fast. The MG EX181 had a 1.5 liter engine from a MGA but it had been tuned to run on was 86% methanol laced with nitrobenzene, acetone and sulphuric ether. I can’t even imagine what the engineers went through to come up with that fuel formula. It doesn’t matter because it worked. In 1957, with Sterling Moss at the wheel, they had a world record setting run of 245mph and placing MG in the record books for all time.

The video below is a twelve minute short that documents the design engineering that went into making this car. It shows how they designed the car around Sterling Moss, streamlining the form for the best performance they could achieve.

Ozone from David D’Imperio.

One of the things I love about technology is how it is helping designers realize and manufacture products that would have been difficult or costly to make just a few years ago. A great example of this is a new lamp from designer David D’Imperio.

Ozone features a stainless steel cluster of discs that are affixed to anĀ aluminum interior structure. The lighting fixture feels airy and weightless, thanks to the manufacturing process, choice of materials and the tight tolerances within the build process. Thanks to the design and manufacturing process, this lamp is available at 6 feet in length or at 50 inches. Even thought the lamp is in many ways huge, the stainless steel canopy is visually very light.

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Ozone Measures approximately 72″ long x 10″H high x 5″ wide or 50″ long x 8″H high x 5″ wide. Power can be connected off-center at multiple points along its length. Suspended on either end via adjustable cables.