Drawing

The End Of The World Is Coming. Lets Study Some Art.

In a world where everything seems to be going to hell in a hand basket, and science is predicting the end of life in the next great mass extinction, it’s nice to know that there is art in the world. The world might be coming to an end at some point in the future, but you still have a chance to educate yourself about art thanks to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum loading 205 free art history books to the Internet Archive, all of which are available as PDF’s or ePub books.  Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.

Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.  Just be sure and pick up a solar powered charger for your phone or tablet so you can keep reading them after the power grid fails.

For the last 5 years, theGuggenheim has been digitizing its exhibition catalogs and art books, placing the results online. So if you want to study some art history this is the right place.  The collection also includes catalogs of retrospective exhibitions on masters like Paul Klee, Robert Rauschenberg, and Mark Rothko. Or you can explore older art with Chinese art in the 20th centurycraftsmen of ancient Perusculpture and works on paper or  Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection: From Picasso to Pollock. What better way to spend your time when you aren’t trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world.

Remember it is the arts and culture that separate us from the animals. Well that and opposable thumbs, larger brain capacity, the ability to create advanced tools, and a few other things.

Advertisements

Truck Art!

Art collector and businessman Jaime Colsa has come up with a way to bring art to the people every day. He is using trucks, as in semi’s as canvasses to showcase the latest trends in painting, drawing and urban art in Spain. For Colsa the trucks challenge each artist to deal with scale, budgets and other obstacles that they had probably not dealt with before.  They are also challenged with the fact the canvas is moving, rendering each work a fleeting moment for it’s audience. It’s a great idea. Get the art out of the gallery space, expose thousands of people to it, and challenge artists to work in a new way. I wish someone would bring this same kind of program over from Europe to the USA.

“Undersong”, Motionpoems.

Matt Smithson, and Man vs Magnet directed and produced “Undersong” for Motionpoems. The animated short is built around the adapted poem by Stacey Lynn Brown, and dedicated to Jake Adam York. The short is voiced by Yaa Asantewa, with additional sound design by Sound Lounge. Asantewa’s voice guides you through the story accompanied by a score from Joshua Smoak. The hand drawn animation is timed perfectly to the voice over and the visuals draw you into the story so well. I’ve watched this over and over noticing small details that I missed with each viewing. It’s a great way to lose yourself for a few minutes on a summer afternoon.

Lets Go To Lithuania.

I’ve never been to Lithuania but now that I’ve seen the worlds longest infographic from design studio Zazu I kind of want to go. The infographic is illustrated with line art that tells you how to get there. some general facts and info on things like population, currency exchange traditional food, and some of their iconic sights to visit. I love the look of this image. There is a certain late 1960’s early 1970’s feel to it with an updated appeal. It has a nice blend between hand drawn, and obviously computer generated, and I’m OK with that. I’m kind of over the sketchy chalkboard art look that has been burning up the design world for the last few years.

To-Lithuania-Infographic

Artist Wes Lang, “THE STUDIO” by I DO ART.

From the 29th of March to the 7th of September 2014, artist Wes Lang has an exhibit of his work showing at ARoS Aarhus Museum of Art. The video below from  is an interview with the artist in his studio and on location at the museum. Lang gives insight into his creative process, and brings to light a simple fact about creativity. Sometimes you just know when something is right, when it’s done, when to stop working on it. More often than not, your brain turns off as you go into that zen zone of creativity and the good stuff just happens. At one point around the 4:30 minute mark he talks about coming back to his studio the next day and not remembering creating certain things from the night before. I can relate to that. Sometimes you are so in the zone of creativity it’s as though something else takes over for you, a muse, a creative spirit, another part of your brain, something, and it’s all good.

Etching Castles in a Grain of Sand.

Once again the Creators Project has released a new video that makes you step back and think. The video below features photographer Vik Muniz and designer Marcelo Coelho who, using science and technology have drawn castles on a grain of sand. The project involves transferring Muniz’s drawings made with a camera lucida to a grain of sane that is less than 1 millimeter wide. The process is done with an ion beam focused on the tiny object which etches the image onto the surface. The narrative makes you stop and think about the imagery, concept of scale, the blend of art and science, and the direction that photography is headed as we move forward.

The Drawing the Process.

“Drawing is a thought process, not a means to reproduce what you see.” this quote from Daniel Weil in the video below, is a a comment that surfaces about 3 minutes in. It arrives as Weil shows off his sketchbooks, and talks about his process, why he draws, and how it helps him resolve problems, and complete ideas. I have said for years, you can’t design if you can’t draw.

This is fundamental to every aspect of the design industry from graphic to industrial to motion and beyond. It is also something that seems to be slipping away from many designers entering the industry today. I say this, because less than 3 years ago I sat in a meeting with a junior level designer that actually said “What if I can’t draw?” after being asked to sketch out some ideas. At the time I remember thinking, “How did you get a degree in design if you can’t draw”, and then moving on.

Over the last few years, the “I can’t draw” phenomenon has surfaced again, and again. This video, shows you why as a designer, you need to, and should draw, sketch, and visualize with something beyond your computer.