Dress Code

Dress Code for Project Ellis

Dress Code has produced a really nice animated short for Project Ellis, an organization dedicated helping immigrants to the United States by providing advice, legal counsel, or money. There is a website hat is listed at the end of the short film, but it’s not quite ready for primetime. The testimonials page still has lorem ipsum greeking text on it. None the less the animation from Dress Code has a really solid look to it with a hint of mid-century modern design that reminds me of the look that Childcraft “How and Why” books I had as a kid. Oh and if you are unaware as to how the fourth and fifth amendments to the United States Constitution work, this will give a quick overview of what they are and how to use them.

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IBM and Dress Code.

Three new spots for IBM from  continue to promote the current look of the IBM brand with limited color pallets, a flat design aesthetic, and solid scripts promoting what could be a rather boring subject. These simple ads feature voice over work from actual IBM employees that explain the problem and offer up a solution based on IBM technologies. I hope that the AOR for IBM keeps this look going, because it is really working for them in all their marketing channels from print to interactive, to broadcast.

 

“These details are not accents or quirks, they are evidence of quality.”

In the short film below for Herman Miller, Dress Code focuses on the production of the iconic Eames Lounge Chair and Ottoman that has been in constant production since 1956. The video documents the visual account of the chair being manufactured, and simultaneously reveals the ethos of Herman Miller’s design principals and process. In two minutes the viewer is presented with lush visuals, and solid narrative that embodies not only the Eames Lounge Chair, but everything Herman Miller produces. The flow, cadence, and visual treatment of the short reads more like a tribute, and less like an ad. This is a great example of an emerging form of online content that feels more engaging and genuine than a typical 30 second spot on TV. Hat tip to Herman Miller for commissioning, and to Dress Code for a great production.

“These details are not accents or quirks. These details are not the details, they are evidence of quality.”