Dynamic Media

Teenage Mutant Motion Posters.

With the cost of large LCD TV’s steadily falling, it’s surprising that you don’t see more movie theaters taking advantage by using the displays for movie posters. The advantages are exponential. Content can be easily updated, tailored to a specific targeted demographic, run promotional information, present show times, or in the case of  Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, create animated movie posters.

Unlike their printed counterpart, the “Motion Poster” makes for a pretty cool experience blending live action footage with animation and the overall marketing message. For the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles film the Motion Poster is being used to introduce each of the main characters combined with a coming soon message. Each unit features sound and vertical video edited for the format and finishes out with a portrait of one of the turtle stars at the end.

The potential for this is huge. Beyond simple video displays, if the monitor was connected to the internet, and had touch screen capabilities, movie marketers would be able to develop dynamic content that would engage passersby on a whole new level. What if the Motion Poster featured game like interaction, or additional content beyond a simple trailer and still frame? What if the poster could interact with your smartphone via NFC, or QR code? What if  the poster connected to a microsite that engaged the viewer and offered promotional items for the movie that could be redeemed at that theater?  I have a feeling that this is just the beginning. That somewhere someone is already working on solutions to the questions I just asked.

Modern Love, and the New York Times.

I really like the fact that the New York Times has embraced dynamic media and is actively producing high quality video and animations for their website. They could have been like so many other publications and thought of it as secondary to the rest of their content, but they haven’t. CAse in point is the animated series “Modern Love” and the videos they have released not only to the New York Times website, but to their Vimeo channel ad other social media outlets.

The video below was released about a week ago via the Times. Directed and animated by Brookly based designer Freddy Arenas, the animated short takes the story of two individuals with a significant age difference in their relationship. Through a clever use of visual metaphors and visual illusions, the short film talks about the devotion of love in the face of adversity and challenges. The piece has a really nice look to it without taking away from the voiceover and the message the narrators set forth. Hat tip to both the New York Times, and Arenas for a job well done.

“Spider Drove a Taxi”.

Over the last ten years, the New York Times has been transitioning from an online news paper, to a dynamic media powerhouse, featuring some of the best short films on the internet. In the last couple of years, the production value of their shorts has reached the same level as the journalism it supports. The video below is a prime example of what I am talking about. Part of a series of five films commissioned by the New York Times Magazine’s “The Lives They Lived” issue, which commemorates people who died this year this film focuses on Johnny “Spider” Footman who was New York’s oldest taxi driver. Spider tells a great story, and has a great message for a Monday morning. The film by   that this short is based on can be found here. The trailer for it is below.

“Be Moved”. Sony USA’s Dynamic Media Marketing Site.

Sony has pulled out all the stops in their latest marketing effort. “Be Moved” is a fully integrated campaign, for Sony USA, features a deep dive website that is filled with rich dynamic media, cutting edge CSS tricks, and plenty of content. The visitor is encouraged to explore through vertical scrolling that reveals heavy CGI models of product that self assemble from exploded models, big budget video production, and engaging editorial. Each section has hooks to social media for specific product, and each video is featured on the Sony channel on YouTube helping to extend engagement and branch reach across channels. If you have the time take a look at the site and really dig around. It’s a great example of where interactive content is going.

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