Flash

Living on the Edge.

logoFor the last two days I’ve been going through training on Adobe’s Edge Animate. I’ve been using this tool for a while now, but the class is actually opening my eyes to the possibilities and limitations that this program has. As someone that has used Flash since it was still called Future Splash, Edge in many ways feels like stepping back in time to 1998. This is no fault of Adobe, this is the reality of working with the limitations of CSS, HTML, and JS. It’s also the reality of using software that is in version 1.5. With that said, here are some things I’d love to see Adobe add in version 2.0

  • import a JPEG, PNG, or GIF sequence as an Edge Symbol
  • Video Support
  • Audio Support
  • Motion Guides
  • A pen tool for masking/clipping

Adobe I hope your listening.

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“Man” a Flash and After Effects Animation by Steve Cutts.

Here is a little animation from Steve Cutts created with Adobe Flash and After Effects. Yes I said Flash, the application long rumored to be dead or dying. The application that Apple loves to hate, yet produces some pretty outstanding work. This little animated short is a humorous look at man’s relationship to our planet and the other creatures that inhabit it. Enjoy.

The Art of Packing, by Louis Vuitton.

I pride myself on the ability to pack a suitcase for a trip in the most space efficient way. I also pride myself on the ability to pack the minimum amount of items needed for a trip. Case in point, when I went to South Africa for 14 days, I packed a small duffel bag for the trip. Seriously, I put 14 days worth of stuff into what was basically a gym bag.

This morning when I was going through RSS feeds, emails, and other sources of information, I came across a link to the Louis Vuitton micro site “The Art of Packing“. While I will probably never own a Louis Vuitton suitcase, the site was worth a visit.

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This Flash based interactive site showcases 3 of Louis Vuitton’s luxury suitcases, Alzer, Pégase and Keepall. (please note that none of these bags are large. If you are the kind of person that packs your entire closet for a weekend trip, you can move on.) The micro site shows potential customers how to pack in the most efficient way allowing you to get the most out of the space, with a less wrinkly results. In addition to space saving tips, the site actually shows you how to pack your clothes in the best way. Yes there is an art to it.

 

Time To Bend Your Noodle and Fight Hunger in America.

CP+B have created a desktop and iPad experience for KRAFT Macaroni & Cheese designed to stop food waste, promote creativity, and help stop hunger in America. The application was built using flash and cross compiled to work on iOS. (I’m kind of surprised hey don’t have an Android version of this available as well since the desktop app was developed using Adobe Flash.)

KRAFT’s ‘Dinner Not Art‘ application donates 10 noodles to Feeding America for every virtual noodle saved in the macaroni art that you create. While this number seems small, think about the number of pieces used on average by a kid when making a macaroni masterpiece. It ads up fast. The application is easy to use and a little addictive. So long term, this could create a large payout for Feeding America if the application takes off.

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The application features a fun easy to use interface that is intuitive for younger children, and actually rather fun for adults. The bright colorful UI reflects the KRAFT Mac and Cheese box and branding colors, but does it in a way that never feels like Kraft is promoting their product. It’s this subtle balance that really wins here. Throughout the experience the participant is shown a counter that increases with each noodle added. (The feel good factor). At the same time the KRAFT brand is represented in an unobtrusive way, and subtly promotes the product. At the end of the experience you have the option of saving and sharing your creations. (another feel good factor).

The Story Behind Adobe’s CS6 Desktop Brand System

I haven’t upgraded to Adobe Creative Suite CS6 yet. I simply can’t afford it right now, and I’ve only been using CS5.5 for about 9 months. That doesn’t mean I haven’t been following the changes, upgrades, and new features at the Adobe site though. Today, while I was perusing the Adobe blog, I came across a really interesting article talking about the number of branded assets that now go into the entire creative suite. These assets comprise everything from application icons, to packaging, and splash screens. Much to my surprise, I found out there are now 5000 shared branded assets. That’s right 5000, and it takes a year to produce all of them.

With software refresh cycles happening every 12 to 18 months, you can bet money that the marketing design team for Adobe is well underway with the branding redesign for CS7. The entire article is on the Adobe Blog and well worth the read if you are a designer, or simply use any of these tools.

“It takes well over a year to design, execute, deliver, and ensure the proper implementation of the roughly 5,000 or so assets it takes to get a CS release out the door (we’re already thinking about CS7). Along the away, there are innumerable institutional, technological, and political hurdles to overcome. It can be daunting, but we do everything we can to get it made with as few design compromises as possible.”

IdeaWorks Christmas, an Audrino and Flash Based Streaming Experience.

The end of the year is usually a slower time for agencies. As the year winds down, it leaves a little bit of free time for folks to promote the company, have a little fun and show off their collective skills.

IdeaWorks in Sydney Austrailia, has done just that with a live streaming interactive Christmas display. The display uses live streaming servers combined with decorations that have been rigged up with audrino boards, and tied to a Flash based interface. The result is pretty fun. If you don’t want to actually play with the site, you can watch the video below.

I recommend clicking this link though, and having a little fun. IdeaWorks Christmas.

Infographic Monday. The Evolution of the Web.

It’s Monday, and that means a link to a fancy schmancy infographic. This one comes to you from the people at Evolution of the Web, and the reason I am posting a linked image is the infographic is interactive.

This goes all the way back to the internet dark ages with browsers like Mosaic, and rolls forward to the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and IE. If you are curious about what is possible and plays well, this interactive image shows where things like HTML5, CSS3, WebGL, and Flash are supported.

 

The color bands in this visualization represent the interaction between web technologies and browsers, which brings to life the many powerful web apps that we use daily.

Click the image below to see the full interactive graphic on The Evolution of the Web site.