Food

Roccbox Will Rock Your Pizza Craving.

I think I need this. No I know I need this. Not only does it look amazing, but the concept is simply brilliant.

Colours

Roccbox name says it all, it´s a stone in a boxthat gets really hot very fast. This way you get stone baking properties. Not only that, this is portable thanks the compact size so you can take it pretty much anywhere. According to the video below you can bake a 12 inch pizza in just over 90 seconds thanks to an internal temperature of 932 degrees farenhite (500c). The special burner enables the inside to heat up in around 15 minutes, which is really quite fast. The stone on the inside is a refractory stone, which is ideal to preserve and disperse heat through out the cooking chamber. Roccbox features spatial insulation materials, and a silicone outer coating so you won´t get burned if you ever touch its surface. It comes with a wood burner, gas burner thermometer, a pizza peel and a recipe book. I love the part in the video where he is cooking a steak in a cast iron skillet in this thing. They reached funding on Indigogo so this thing is available for order in a handful of countries including the USA.

Heat-Flow-1 Roccbox-features

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Travel, Architecture, Food, and Cocktails.

A poster series after my own heart. What could be better than travel, architecture, food and cocktails? This series of posters created by Dublin based design studio me&him&you features 14 great world cities that are identified by architectural landmarks and a signature drink or food for each. The 17 by 24 inch one color posters are silkscreened onto 190 gram Rothmill cream paper,with solvent free, water based ink. Each poster is hand numbered and signed.

Prints are delivered rolled in a strong postage tube packed in acid-free tissue paper. Each print is accompanied with an information slip about the project, blind embossed with our company seal. At sixty Euro, or about $75.00 I know what I’m adding to my Christmas wish list.

BerlinPrint-570x712

boston2-570x712

HongKong-570x712

mehimyou.BarcelonaC-570x712

mehimyou.Chicago-570x712

mehimyou.Copenhagen-570x712

mehimyou.Dublin-570x712

mehimyou.Melbourne-570x712

mehimyou.Oslo_-570x712

mehimyou.SanFrancisco-570x712

mehimyou.Stockholm-570x712

mehimyou.Sydney2-570x712

mehimyou.TOKYO_-570x712

mehimyou.Zurich-570x712

Paris-570x712

Toronto-570x712

 

 

 

 

Toddler Food Trucks from OTO

What a fun toy idea for kids. OTO is making food trucks for pre-school kids from design company Blacklist. The truck is constructed out of recycled cardboard and printed with fun, lush, super detailed illustrations. After spending two years prototyping and promoting the idea on indigogo Blacklist and OTO are now at the point where the rucks are production ready! The cardboard food truck measure in at 40” x 36” x 24”. They are made from 100% recyclable materials and completely fun for your aspiring Cordon Bleu Kinder Chef.

Each truck was first modeled and rendered in 3D by HIFI3D, to achieve realistic shadings and reflections as well as an insane level of detail down to the last screw. After that, Blacklist’s designers draw the lettering and illustrations on top of the renders. Each truck features hand drawn typography that is printed along with other graphics in the final process as well.

Famous OTO from Pistachios on Vimeo.

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CCVI, Food Fight 3.

Tonight I had the privilege of attending the “Food Fight 3” benefit for CCVI “Children’s Center for the Visually Impaired” at Studio Dan Meiners. As usual, the food was outstanding, the company was great, and the cook off every bit as exciting as last nights Super Bowl.

It’s been a long day, and my Internet service from sucky Time Warner is down yet again, so I’m posting via iPone. This post will be short and to the point, with a couple of Instagram images of two of my fave KC chefs and people. If you get a chance go to http://www.ccvi.org and make a donation. It’s for a great cause.

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Happy Thanksgiving!

Today marks the annual Thanksgiving holiday here in America, and as I sit here in front of my computer, in my warm home, with a hot cup of coffee, I am truly grateful and thankful for everything I have. There are so many people in the world that aren’t as fortunate as I am, and I have been blessed with so much.


Last night I got to thinking about the history of Thanksgiving. For most people the history of Thanksgiving is the story of the pilgrims and the native Americans sitting down to a huge feast at Plymouth Rock after almost starving to death in the first year of living in the colonies. Part of that is true, but the history of Thanksgiving is actually much more.

As we all know, the Pilgrims first arrived in the American colonies on December 11, 1620. The Pilgrims were not prepared for the New England winter they were to face. A winter that claimed 46 lives of the 102 pilgrims in the first few months. After surviving the winter, they were able to take advantage of the good soil, and abundant wildlife and that fall they had an excellent harvest, much of which can be attributed to what the native Americans taught them.

The Pilgrims had a traditional English Harvest Feast, giving thanks to god for surviving and for the blessings of the harvest that would help them survive the second winter in the colonies. In contrast to Thanksgiving today, the Pilgrims actually had more meat than vegetables. The menu for the Harvest Feast included venison, fish, wild fowl, which probably had very little wild turkey in it. ( The chief of the native American tribe that attended the feast brought 5 freshly killed deer to the party as a gift to the pilgrims. Another act that probably helped them to survive a second winter. ) The Pilgrims probably had very little in the way of desserts since baking items like flour and sugar would have been in short supply. They did however have an abundance of corn and fruit, instead of pumpkin pie, the probably had roasted pumpkin. The Harvest Feast lasted for three days true to its origins in England.

Thanksgiving as we know it today, was not an annual event in America for many years following the first Thanksgiving in 1621. In 1623 there had been a severe drought that had placed additional hardships on the pilgrims. In October of that year, the Pilgrims held a prayer service, praying for rain, and an end to the drought. When their prayers were answered they held another Thanksgiving celebration inviting the Native Americans to join them again. The reality is though, times in the first American colonies were hard, and being able to celebrate every year was not a reality.

On June 20th, 1676 the city of Charlestown, Massachusetts celebrated a day of Thanksgiving. It was in many respects the first official Thanksgiving celebration. This celebration however was quite different from the first Thanksgiving held by the Pilgrims in 1621. This celebration was to honor the military victory over the Native Americans which had been taking place for a number of years. This celebration would not take place again until 1789 when the city celebrated the victory of the United States over the English in the Revolutionary War. The new President George Washington established the first national Thanksgiving holiday in 1789, even though he met resistance from other founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson.

Thanksgiving as we know it today, didn’t arrive until 1863. Sarah Josepha Hale decided to promote Thanksgiving in her magazine, Boston Ladies’ Magazine and in Godey’s Lady’s Book. She also wrote letters to different governors and presidents. Abraham Lincoln finally established Thanksgiving as the last Thursday in November. The date was changed a few times (to the third Thursday), but in 1941 was finally established on its current date, the fourth Thursday in November.

Since 1863 the focus has drifted away from a day set aside to truly be thankful for all that we have. It has become a day to eat copious amounts of food, watch football on TV, nap on the couch, and as of late hit the stores for deep discounts on consumer goods. And while there is nothing wrong with any of that, the thing I am trying to remember is that this is a day to be thankful for all I have. I am truly blessed, and have a great life. I need to be thankful and extend a helping hand this holiday season to those less fortunate. I encourage everyone else to do the same.

Monday Morning Melons.

I have a huge amount of respect for sculptures, and those that can carve things.  The ability to take an object and transform it into a three-dimensional representation of something else is pretty impressive. Now throw into that mix, perishable, primarily liquid, fruits and vegetables and the level of color me impressed goes up.

Vid Nikolic is a Croatian chef who like many chefs carves food. What sets Nikolic apart is his ability to carve watermelons. Now before you yawn and click on to a new site, take a look at the time-lapse video shot of Nikolic carving said melon into a set of roses.

Bet you wish you had something this fancy at your Fourth of July Picnic.

Click Image To Watch On Vimeo