Geometry

Cement Truck Murals by Andrea Bergart.

This morning while I was searching for a completely unrelated item I came across this video on Vimeo about artist Andrea Bergart and a project she was working on about a year ago. The short film looks at how she transformed cement trucks in New York into rolling murals that feature her brightly colored, geometric works. It’s a great idea, and one that she talks about in the film. Why hadn’t anyone thought about painting cement trucks before and turning them into rolling murals? The short film by  and Simon Biswas has a really nice quality to it. High production value, nice 70’s inspired soundtrack, casual, fresh and informative.

Resonance Visualized.

OK this is cool blend of art, science and music. Before you watch the videos  here is a warning from the creator of the video. If you are wearing headphones turn the volume down before playing the second un edited video so you don’t damage your hearing.

What we have below is an experiment that uses a tone generator to vibrate sand on a metal plate into distinct patterns created by the frequency of the audio. Say What? In other words Sound vibrates the plate and makes cool patterns.

“So this experiment is the Chladni plate experiment. I used a tone generator, a wave driver (speaker) and a metal plate attached to the speaker. First add sand to the plate then begin playing a tone. Certain frequencies vibrate the metal plate in such a way that it creates areas where there is no vibration. The sand “falls” into those areas, creating beautiful geometric patterns. As the frequency increases in pitch the patterns become more complex.”

Remember To Turn The Volume Down Before You Watch This.

I’ve Been Mugged.

Maybe it’s because I went to engineering school for a while, or maybe it’s because I see the geometry that is associated with good design, but these mugs made me smile. I love the fact that they have the mathematical formula on them. I love the fact  that they are named Zero Gravity. I love the fact that they stand on edge precariously balancing your cup of coffee.

Designed by the Shanghai based firm Xu54 this porcelain mug works because of the exact slope at which it sits.