History

The Unoffical History of America’s National Parks

The video below is the unofficial history of the National Parks of the United States. It’s a lo-fi lesson in history with a bit of humor thrown in for good measure. Made by — Ryan Maxey: MaxeyFishAndSea.com there is a ton of historical footage, bad titles, 8 bit music, and one very important point. How much the arts had to do with the development, and survival of our National Park System.

 

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Ted Ed, How Hitler Rose To Power. An Animated Short.

The video below is a lesson in history and how fragile democracy can be. Alex Gendler and Anthony Hazard lesson were animated by Uncle Ginger for Ted ED, and as the video progresses creates some uncanny parallels to this election cycle in America. The video itself is wonderfully animated and illustrated. The look keeps the viewer engaged as the narrator  explains how Hitler came to power in Germany, and the events following the end of the First World War that helped to propel his rise in power. It is a quick overview that manages to summarize the history into a quick and digestible lesson. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions about the parallels to this year’s elections and the candidates running.

 

175 Years of Cunard.

Digitas LBi has put together an impressive and ambitious 2 minute animated short to help Cunard celebrate it’s 175th anniversary. The short is an animated timeline that highlights the milestones and accomplishments that Cunard has made in it’s 175 year history. Through out the piece, the styles of the illustrations change to reflect the era they are from. This coupled with a changing score, excellent sound design and fluid motion help to keep you engaged through the entire two minute online spot. The YouTube video also links back to the microsite that was built for Cunard’s special 175th anniversary cruises. At the microsite, there is an additional series of videos that highlight the anniversary, and Cunard achievements, and a section where you can book a cruise.

Nice work all the way around.

Razorfish Emerging Experiences’ “Flight Deck” for SFO.

Last week I was traveling through San Francisco International airport so I had the privilege of seeing this first hand. It’s pretty amazing in person and the photos do not do it justice. Razorfish has created an immersive experience that tries to recapture the golden age of travel, before jetliners became the Greyhound busses of the skies.

There are three total components to the entire experience; an interactive and real time large scale projection, the multi-touch kiosks, and the mobile  component. “Flight Deck” Featuring massive digital displays customers can see real-time flight information and updates, and interact with 6 touchscreen kiosks that feature interactive content about the San Francisco bay area, and the destinations the airport serves world wide.The entire service is connected to a mobile service allowing travelers to be connected even on the go.

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While the primary experience lives at Terminal 3, with the projected visualization functioning as a beacon calling on all SFO guests to contribute to the global SFO travel story, the total experience extends beyond SFO in the end. If you are traveling through San Francisco and have the time, I highly recommend stoping by to see this. For more info on Flight Deck, click here.

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London Then and Now. A Project from Simon Smith and Claude Friese-Greene.

Here is a rather interesting post from Vimeo for Monday. In 1927 cinematographer Claude Friese-Greene, inventor of the Friese-Greene Color process for film cameras traveled to London and shot some extraordinary silent footage of the city. In 2013, as a personal project   has attempted to recreate each of Friese-Greene’s shots. It’s pretty amazing to look at the split screen and see not only how much the city has changed, but how much of it has remained the same.

“During the 1920s, cinematographer Claude Friese-Greene travelled across the UK with his new colour film camera. His trip ended in London, with some of his most stunning images, and these were recently revived and restored by the BFI, and shared across social media and video websites.

Since February I have attempted to capture every one of his shots, standing in his footsteps, and using modern equivalents of his camera and lenses. This has been a personal study, that has revealed how little London has changed.”

D Day Comes Alive 69 Years Later Thanks to C4 and Digit.

69 years ago yesterday, the end of WWII began with the Normandy Invasion by allied forces. To commemorate the event, BBC Channel 4 launched an immersive online event that chronicled the 24 hour period minute by minute. The result is an impressive blend of vintage news and history, coupled to dynamic technologies that bring the history alive. For a generation of people that are removed from the Second World War, this integrated television/website/social media program brings the history alive with a new vitality.

D-Day: As it Happens” told the story of The Normandy Invasion through the perspectives of seven people who were there in 1944. Those individuals include a nurse, a paratrooper and a military cameraman, and infantrymen.

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To kick off the event BBC 4 ran an hour long show on June 5 which introduced the back stories of each character. The following day there was a follow up program that recapped the events that took place on June 6, 1944. Between the timing of the first program and the follow up, internet users could track progress in real time through a breaking news-style website created by Digit and by following individual Twitter feeds set up for each of the “D-Day 7”.

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The website and TV shows used newly found and previously unseen material collected over a 15 year period by D-Day researcher Colin Henderson. Henderson’s radio reports, film, photographs and records allowed Digit to create maps plotting each of the D-Day 7’s locations throughout the day and develop a 24-hour live feed displaying their reactions, that connected to photographs and video footage of the invasion. Over the 24 hour period of time, more than 1,000 updates were posted to the site with the written accounts taken from historical records including diaries and interviews.

“The idea was to take yesterday’s news and tell it through today’s technology. If D-Day happened now, there would be rolling coverage, live feeds and constant Twitter updates. By using the web and social media, we managed to create something that had people engrossed in the characters and their stories,”

Digit creative director Adam Lawrenson.