Holland

JSPR Retro Office.

One of the things I remember from Jr. High science classes is the lab furniture. It stands out because it had a very distinctive 1960’s flair to it, with sharp clean lines and a color pallet that was coded for each work station. I have no idea who made it or designed it, but who ever it was they did the job right. They created a distinct memory that has lasted to this day.

Dutch firm JSPR offers a line of office furniture that reminds me of those work areas from long ago. Their Retro Office series uses color blocking to create different feelings or zones within the work environment. The look of the pieces is designed to engage with the ambience of the sixties and seventies with a nod to mid-century office furniture by companies like Steelcase

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Retro Office is built with all steel construction. The tops are finished with a semi gloss powder coated lacquer. The frames are finished with a matte coated lacquer. I really like how JSPR left the welds exposed as a structural design element with a minimum amount of clean up. Something about that adds visual strength to the clean lines of the frame work and top. The desks are available in 29 colors, and three configurations, and it looks like you can purchase direct from the manufacturer

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Almost but Not Quite. KLM Must See Map, no App.

KLM has been a big participant in promotional marketing campaigns grounded in social media for sometime. The video below shows the latest from the Dutch airline. The “Must See Map” is built on suggestions of things to do, and places to see from friends responses to a social media query. It asks the traveler to simply ask friends in their social network where they have been and what they have done, then gathers all of this information into a single source.

What is great about this campaign is the fact that KLM will send you a print on demand high-res physical map. What I don’t like is the fact that the map will take 3 weeks to arrive, and there is no dedicated smartphone app. The free online site does a great job of integrating with all of the major social network players, allowing the traveler to gather vast amounts of tips but offers no dedicated smartphone app.

While the physical map is a cool souvenir for your trip, and ties to all the places your socially networked friends tell you to go; it is quite surprising that KLM didn’t take this one step further. A dedicated app is much easier to carry and use than a physical printed map. A dedicated app allows for recommendations to come to you long after the map is printed. A dedicated app allows the traveler to post feedback on friends recommendations. A dedicated app, takes the concept to a whole new level, and extends use far beyond the interaction of the website.

KLM

This is a great concept, and I hope that KLM goes a little further with it. KLM currently has 10 apps that they have developed for the iPhone, so I could see them taking this to a whole new level. When they do, “Must See Map” will be a home run.

KLM Airline’s “Tile Your Self” Facebook Campaign.

As Facebook becomes more and more of giant advertising engine, companies are scrambling to produce advertising that fits within the social media platform, and is actually engaging for the user. This is a tricky balancing act between creating something that seems real, and less like an ad, or creating something that feels like an ad, and gets very little traction and social engagement from your user base.

KLM Airlines have tapped into something that represents Holland, and elevates Dutch national pride. Building off of Delft tiles, something that Holland is known for, KLM has created a Facebook application that allows fans of KLM to Delft themselves and create a Delftware tile of their Facebook profile picture. Facebook users can decorate their profile picture, add an inspirational saying and share with friends by using the KLM ‘Tile Yourself’ Facebook App.When you create and share your tile, you are automatically entered into a contest where the winners get to have their tile placed on a KLM jet, which will make numerous international flights promoting KLM and Facebook.

All of this is well and good, but the payoff for participation seems pretty weak. Yes you get to make a cool looking Facebook profile pic and share it with your friends, but in the end what are your chances of actually seeing your image on the plane? I saw this and couldn’t help but think, why didn’t KLM offer the winners a custom one off Delftware tile with their image on it? Or the winners get a free trip on the plane that carries the tile images? There are so many more possibilities for this campaign that seem to have been missed.

Written Portraits by Van Wanten Etcetera for CPNB.

I read quite a bit. Not as much as I should, but enough. Most of the time the reading material is varied, anything from technical books on software I use, to superfluous fluff novels by authors like Dan Brown. One thing I am going to admit at the beginning of this post is, I don’t read a whole lot of Dutch literature. It’s not that I have something against it, it just doesn’t rise to the forefront of my reading experience. With that said, the new ad campaign to promote Dutch literature by Amsterdam based agency Van Wanten Etcetera, might just have me reading more.

This wonderful set of images were created by illustrator Souverein for Van Wanten Etcetera by literally carving books into portraits of the authors.

Each year the Col­lec­tive­Pro­mo­tion for Dutch Lit­er­a­ture organ­ises the “Dutch Book Week” to pro­mote Dutch ­lit­er­a­ture.Each year has a specif book genre that is profiled and this years choice was Autobiography. The theme “Geschreven­Portret­ten” translates to Writ­ten Por­traits, and to capture this Van Wan­ten Etcetera cre­ated a series of images that show the dif­fer­ent faces behind the Autobiogra­phies. AnneFrank, Vin­cent van Gogh, Louis van Gaal and Kader Abdol­lah. The illustrator Sou­verein made the art­work doing an amaz­ing of job cre­at­ing real­is­tic sculptural images of the authors. Even orig­i­nal book pages were used for the tex­tin­side the por­traits to get right struc­ture for each portrait.

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The finished pieces are really wonderful print advertisements. The photography that captures the artwork is superb, color pallets and typographic use works  for the campaign. Simple clean layouts focus on the authors, and don’t overwhelm the subject. This is a visually stunning campaign for CPNB