Hornet

UnTypical Whiskey Needs an Untypical Ad.

Most adult beverage ads follow typical themes that are designed to appeal to a broad demographic with an occasional break out amongst them. For the most part, though, they are predictable, whether it’s beer, wine, whiskey, vodka, or the ubiquitous hard seltzer that is everywhere these days. As we ramp up to the height of the holiday season, be prepared to see more of them if you still watch live TV or use a streaming service that won’t let you skip ads.

To break free of the current trend of whiskey ads that feature some sort of woodsy man theme with barns full of barrels, and a money shot of brown liquid in a glass surrounded by an exuberant amount of atmosphere 1792 and Ariel Costa of Hornet tried a different approach. Working with BUNTIN, Costa decided to embrace the difference that sets 1792 apart focusing on a more urban, stylish, and sophisticated look. The thirty-second spot produced by Hornet features atmospheric and intriguing content as well as highly crafted animation and sound design – all designed to dramatize the premise that “An UNtypical night calls for an UNtypical whiskey”.

BUNTIN working with Hornet and Costa decided to embody that difference 1792 brings to the tables and put it at the heart of a new campaign called “UNtypical”. Launching with ‘The UNtypical Stories”, a digital and social initiative that includes paid and organic social media, online videos, retargeting, and website content.

“1792 bourbon is distinctly different,” notes BUNTIN Co-President and COO Dave Damman. “It doesn’t act like other bourbons, doesn’t taste like other bourbons, and certainly doesn’t look like other bourbons. Its unique position and packaging clearly stand out in the ever-growing bourbon category.”

For 1792, Damman says BUNTIN is developing a campaign focused on 1792’s “untypical” and differentiating factors. “1792 has more sophistication and style than other bourbons, and the bottle design and tasting notes back that up,” he says, adding that the creative will focus on the brand’s product essence through stylish visuals showing 1792 as the “key” that unlocks unexpected cosmopolitan experiences. “We want to inspire people to express their own unique style and be anything but typical.”

The new creative, which will rely heavily on video across digital media, will begin appearing in the U.S. prior to Thanksgiving, with plans to extend the campaign to markets in South Korea and China in early 2022.

This is such a nice approach for an adult beverage ad. They could have gone down a tried and true path producing a forgettable 30-second spot. This however stands out. It’s got a great look and feel and definitely appeals to an audience that is looking for a sophisticated urban vibe. It’s very much on brand point for 1792.

Rice Krispies Dinosaurs.

If you ever wonder what it takes to get a TV commercial produced, take a look at the credit list below this Rice Krispies spot by Hornet. It’s insane. Actually it’s not. It’s simply proof that good work, sometimes takes more than a few, and collaboration and team work produce some killer results. Directed by Yves Geleyn, who helped to create “The Bear and the Hare” for John Lewis is at it again creating a light hearted, fun spot that features hand crafted and animated wooden puppets. The entire piece is narrated by a young boy who brings his imaginative story to life with the help of his small dinosaur friends.

Director: Yves Geleyn
Produced by: Hornet
Executive Producer: Jan Stebbins
Producer: Cathy Kwan
Live Action Puppet Shoot Producer: Joel Kretschman
Live Action Producer: Jennifer Pearlman
Editor: Anita Chao

PUPPET SHOOT
Produced by: Hornet
Director of Photography: Ivan Abel
Art Director: Elise Ferguson
Fabricators: Nathan Aquith, Erika Bettencourt, Hillary Barton, Eric Duke, Peter Erickson, Jon Hartman, Ben Kress, Tim McDonald
Puppeteers: Tyler Bunch, Billy Barkhurst, David Feldman, Steven Widerman
1st AC: Emilie Jackson
Motion Control Operator: Don Canfield
DIT: Roman France
Gaffer: Michael Yetter
Best Boy: Jarrod Kloiber
Key Grip: Casey Wooden
2nd Grip: Matt Cryan
VTR Operator: Jon Osterman
Script Supervisor: Stephanie Andreou
Production Assistants: Milton Katz, Stevie Weinstein-Foner
Intern: Jon Hartman

POST-PRODUCTION
Produced by: Hornet Inc
Storyboard Artist: Carlos Ancalmo
Background Design: Bryan Lashelle
Character Designers: Andres Guierrez Torres, Sylvain Marc
Animatic Animators: Michelle Higa, David Hill
Supervising Technical Director: Sang Jin Bae
Technical Director: Ylli Orana
Tracking, Lighting & Rendering: Richard Kim
Modeling & Texturing: Ylli Orana, Richard Kim
CG Animator: Sean Thorpe
Compositors: Lee Gingold, John Harrison

LIVE ACTION
Produced by: Hornet
Director of Photograpy: Russell Swanson
2nd AD: Brock Lee
AC: Dave Turner
Art Director: Scott Sicari
Food Stylist: Brian Croney
Wardrobe Stylist: Kristen Robertiello
Hair/Makeup: Jacob Geraghty
Asst Makeup: Chelsea Reiss
Prop Master: Michael Sicari
Prop Assistants: Nick Horton, James Quinn
Gaffer: Gary Haspel
Best Boy: Chris Bucior
Genny Driver: Bryan Rubin
Key Grip: Derek Murphy
Best Boy: Sal Carole
Production Supervisor: Marc Kelly
Production Manager: Jessica O’Brieni
DIT: Doug Anderson
Script Supervisor: Renee Van Dorn
VTR: Jon Charity
Truck Driver: Jason D’Aversa
Production Assistants: Dallas Dodge, Isiah Brightly, Jamie Pizarro, Radimeus Floresvence
Music: Huma-Huma Original Music & Sound
Sound Design: Chris Turner @ Jungle Studios

Monster in the Closet.

I’ve been on a kick posting about PSA’s as of late. I’m not going to give the plot away on this, or tell you what it’s for. I will say that it is going to make you think, and probably make you mad. Directed by Yves Geleyn for Hornet, the animation style is wonderful and inviting. It will draw you in and hook you, then leave you thinking about the outcome.

Hornet and Oscar.

With “Flat Design” being all the rage these days in UI design and graphics, it’s no shock that it is making it’s way back into the world of motion graphics and animation. The three animated shorts from Hornet below are for insurance company Oscar. These bright, light, and flat spots are charming and fun to watch. Like JC Penny’s recent animated TV spots, this flat graphical look is a breath of fresh air in a crowded marketplace.