LED

Waarmakers Ninebyfour.

Most fluorescent style light fixtures are for lack of a better term, ugly. This partly due to the need for ballast, the power supply, and the heat the lamps give off. Waarmakers however has created Ninebyfour a tube lamp using LED’s. Because they don’t generate heat, or have a large power supply this minimal lamp is quite beautiful, and one made from uncharacteristic materials.

20140105-131557.jpgThe lamps are designed and built with reclaimed wood that comes from salvaged trees cut down in and around the Amsterdam area. Each lamp comes with a location marker stamped in the cork portion of the fixture. If you enter the coordinates in Google Maps, the origin of your lamps source tree shows up.

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MINI Art Beat, Vine, and Rolling Social Media.

Pushing the boundaries on Social Advertising, MINI has converted a  Mini Countryman into a rolling billboard powered by Vine video streams. The Countryman is covered in thousands of LED lights arranged in a structured array on the vehicle. The LED lights are fed Vine video streams which play back on the car as it cruises the streets of London at night. Now this is a pretty inventive way to use the Twitter owned social media video site.  The entire backstory on the production, technology, and campaign can be found at the MINI Space Blog here.

Philips and Apple Team Up To Make Your House Smarter and Brighter.

I really like the idea of using LED light bulbs in my house. I just wish they weren’t so expensive. What I might start doing is replacing them one at a time in order to keep the cost down, and make my house greener.

A few months back Philips introduced a new LED light that is now going to be carried exclusively in Apple stores around the world. The Philips Hue is a smart LED bulb that aims to shake up the home automation market by allowing the bulb to be controlled via a smartphone app that runs on iOS and Android.

 

With support for up to 50 bulbs, Philips Hue offers up to 80 percent less power than a traditional bulb, lasts up to 15 years, and changes color. The cost will set you back a bit though, with each bulb costing $59.00. When the bulbs go on sale tomorrow, you will be able to buy them in starter pack sets of 3 which includes  a bridge, that connects the bulbs to your wireless router and with each other using the open ZigBee Light Link standard. Once you have the bulbs connected, they link with the Hue smartphone and tablet apps.

Using the smartphone app, users can personalize their lighting settings, program times and utilize Philips “LightRecipes” to set the mood for your house or room at a specific time.

Art and Science Collide. “Patterned by Nature”.

Commissioned by the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences for their newly built research center, Patterned by Nature is a 10 foot wide by 90 foot long ribbon that winds through the five story atrium of the building. The sculpture celebrates the abstraction of nature’s infinite complexity into patterns through the scientific process.

Running on a low 75 watts of power, Patterned by Nature is made of 3600 tiles of LCD glass that animate light in patterns across scales of space and time. Animations are created by independently varying the transparency of each piece of glass.

The video below is a wonderful showcase to the piece, which I’m sure looks even more amazing in person.

“The content cycles through twenty programs, ranging from clouds to rain drops to colonies of bacteria to flocking birds to geese to cuttlefish skin to pulsating black holes. The animations were created through a combination of algorithmic software modeling of natural phenomena and compositing of actual footage.

An eight channel soundtrack accompanies the animations on the ribbon, giving visitors clues to the identity of the pixelated movements. In addition, two screens show high resolution imagery and text revealing the content on the ribbon at any moment.”

ORE Containers.

Over the weekend I took advantage of the unseasonably warm weather and began landscaping a section of my front yard. I spent a large portion of Saturday and Sunday, planning, and installing edging, moving dirt, and prepping for plants that will go in a couple of weeks from now.

While planning things out and surveying the entry to the house, I decided that I needed to add planters at key locations. I needed to anchor sections of the yard where it meets walkways and the structure of the house. I also started thinking about lighting and the roll it would play at night with the surrounding foliage. Thanks to ORE, I might be able to kill two birds with one stone.

Since 2003 ORE has focused on developing products for the garden design industry by manufacturing contemporary lines of signature containers, fire pits, benches and architectural elements in Utah. Designer Shane Larson used his expertise in sculpture and metal work to create a line of contemporary outdoor furniture that is durable, functional, and elegant. The products produced by ORE qualify for LEED points, if you are looking for ways to green your home, and yard.

I really like the metal cube containers and column containers with integrated LED lighting solutions. The simple shapes with bright color finishes, and hidden ground lighting, make a bold statement without overpowering the surrounding architecture, and landscape. All the containers are available in any of ten colors ranging from powder coated red to neutral gray.

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Light Up Friday Afternoon with “Rima”.

For the last 4 days I have been working on a heavy animation piece that at times makes my eyes spin. It’s partly due to the red and white patterns I am animating, and partly due to the low light that I work in. This might explain my obsession of late with lighting fixtures and lamps, although I doubt it.

This afternoon while rendering a section of footage I took some time to cruise through a number of design/manufacturing sites, and I came across this wonderful desk lamp from Dreipuls. Rima absolutely knocked me over when I saw the images and video on the Dreipuls website. The lamp is elegant, clean, and feels like something Dieter Rams would have designed for Braun back in the day.

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Rima is a unique lamp that allows the user to adjust lighting by moving light, not the lamp to the desired location. This is made possible by several series-connected LEDs which are controlled by moving rings on a processor which controls the light. The position of each ring controls the amount of power given to each LED bank within the lamp, the angle of each LED, the color of the light, and light intensity. This allows whoever is using the lamp to vary each LED group in a multitude of ways.

Vibea Outdoor Lighting.

After Saturday and Sunday’s latest round of snow, I am really ready for spring. The fact that it’s almost March and I am walking the dogs in temperatures hovering around 13 degrees in the morning just adds to the need for warmth. So in order to manifest warm spring weather I am posting a little thing about outdoor lighting. You know the kind of thing you could enjoy while sitting outside on a warm night, relaxing, taking in pleasant breezes, sipping a cool drink…

Spanish company Vibia has created an extensive playground of contemporary outdoor lighting. Unusual and off-the-wall outdoor lighting design ideas, from Vibia are transforming lighting into an art form with sculptural and striking pieces. The stunning Tree 4000 lighting collection, designed by Pete Sans, resemble manicured drop-shaped conifers, spun from white polyurethane standing on metallic trunks. Each light contains compact fluorescent bulbs to cast a soft gentle glow on your outdoors while keeping energy costs low. I wish there was a LED option available but sadly no. Perhaps Vibia will add it in the future as LEDs become more popular and affordable.

In addition to the new 4000 series, is one of my personal favorites. Vibia’s “Break”, designed by J.I.I. Xuda and M Alemany.

Each lamp is a rectangular tower approximately 31 inches tall by 12 inches square. The top of the lamp is cube balanced on point allowing light to illuminate from below the cube spilling out across the tower base. Like the 400 series, Break uses compact fluorescent bulbs. Break is available in 4 finishes ranging from white lacquer to concrete.

I think what I like about Break is the rectilinear simplicity of the forms and the use of natural feeling materials like concrete for the finish.

You can download the entire catalog here, but you will have to register in order to get it.