Leo Burnett

The Fiat Parking Assistant Billboard.

After living downtown and watching people try to parallel park their cars for a year, I think this billboard from Fiat needs to be everywhere. Why? Because most people simply can’t parallel park. Beyond that this is a real nice piece of ambient marketing that uses slick in house developed technology to pull it off. Designed by Leo Burnett in Germany, the Parking Billboard uses ultrasonic sensors tied to pre-recorded videos to help guide drivers as they park. Leo Burnett has created a fun, memorable piece to promote their small city cars and extend the brand to non Fiat drivers as well. Nice stuff guys.

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It’s Going To Be A “Heart Winter”.

I’m not a fan of McDonalds food, but you have to hand it to their advertising. It’s usually top notch, and they do hire the best. McDonalds AOR Leo Burnett hired BUCK to produce the new animated TV spot for the McCafe line of hot drinks. Directed by Ryan Honey BUCK blends 2D and 3D animation seamlessly in the 30 second spot titled “Heart Winter”. The spot features nicely stylized, but not overly cute character’s clever transitions between scenes, and a fluid animation style all set to a jangly happy tune.  It’s hard not to like the look of the commercial, even if you aren’t a fan of McDonalds.

Executive Creative Director: Ryan Honey
Executive Producer: Maurie Enochson
Associate Creative Directors: Jenny Ko, Steve Day
CG Supervisor: Doug Wilkinson
Producer: Billy Mack
Production Coordinator: Kaitlyn Mahoney
Storyboards: Morgan Schweitzer, Vincent Lee, Marcus Park, Susan Yung
Design: Jenny Ko, Yuki Yamada, Susan Yung, Gunnar Pettersson, Ken Gunn Lee, Joe Mullen
Cel Animation: Kendra Ryan, Kyle Mowat, Eric Cheng, Laura Yilmaz, Craig Yamamoto, Ben Conkin, Song Kim
AE Animation & Compositing: Nick Petley, Simon Ekstrand Appel, Anthony Madlangbayan, Zach Eastburg, Esteban Esquivo, Jake Portman, Ariel Costa
3D Artists: Wing Lee, Florent Raffray

 

New York Writes Itself. A Production by the People of New York.

I came across New York Writes Itself this afternoon while waiting for a number of video renders to finish up. Designed and developed by Leo Burnett, New York, the website invites the citizens of New York city to participate with creative writing, music, art, and film by collecting their stories. The trailer below is nice, but the actual pieces written and left on the website are outstanding.

Like all things these days, the site is hooked into all the social media outlets helping to extend its reach and allowing you to spread the stories encased there far beyond their point of origin. If you get a chance, check it out.

5 Frustrations of the Mobile Shopping Experience

Tis the season for online shopping, and this year in particular seems to have marked itself as the season for online mobile shopping. As the mobile marketplace evolves, and more and more people are using smart phones, you are now in a position to browse items, compare prices, read ratings and reviews, look for deals and more – all from their phone. As digitally savvy shoppers refine their smart phone skills, are retailers’ mobile shopping tools meeting the mark? For the most part, not really. The mobile experience is good, but in many cases it misses the mark and leaves shoppers frustrated. I for one hate the mobile Amazon app on my iPhone, and I am annoyed that I can’t switch to the standard Amazon website easily from the top of the page when I hit it.

Leo Burnett recently did a down and dirty study of online shopping experiences on Black Friday 2010. This is what they found out from the mobile shoppers they surveyed.

1. Don’t make me wait: Load time counts.  Mobile connections are still advancing, and we’re left with what can sometimes remind us of our dial-up Internet days. While much of the blame lies with a person’s connection and/or phone, there are optimizations that can be made to mobile websites and apps to speed up the user experience. For example, mobile sites should use compressed file sizes for content rendering and look to eliminate excess scripts and code. Test your mobile site and apps and look for ways to improve delays.

2. Don’t make me opt in: I just want to use your app!  These users are on the hunt and don’t want to take time to register for your database. Allow them to shop first and then opt in. The more value you can give, the more likely they’ll want to hear from you.

3. Don’t bump me from a great experience to a poor experience: Keep it streamlined.  Pushing your app shopper to a website that’s not yet optimized for mobile is going to cause an instant drop-off. If you cannot add all desired functionality into your app, ensure your website is optimized for mobile. Also, don’t limit your mobile website’s functionality. HTML 5 brings features like geo-location and offline usage to mobile websites. Take advantage of this to deliver smarter experiences that can be used just as seamlessly as an app.

4. Give me context: Be meaningful.  Shopping on Black Friday can be ruthless. When one of our shoppers caught another shopper beating her to the store’s last discounted vacuum cleaner, she felt discouraged and defeated. While the same deal rested on the store’s website, she had no way of knowing this without tracking down a busy store representative. Don’t forget to tell shoppers about your mobile shopping tools. Add in-store signage and reminders on your circulars, emails and desktop websites.

5. Let it be fun: Great experiences go a long way.  Shopping apps feel dull and boring. How do you capture the attention away from those Angry Birds? While the most successful mobile experiences are customized and utilitarian, smartphones, like iPhone and Android-powered phones, were built for experiencing music, games, hi-res photos and beautiful designs. Why not dial-up the entertainment factor of your experience? One of our shoppers wished he could hold up a sweater’s color next to a photo of his mom to help him visualize whether or not it matched her style. If Benjamin Moore can make buying paint fun, can’t we make shopping for clothes more fun?

Keep It Simple Stupid.

I am a firm believer in the principals of “Keep It Simple Stupid” when it comes to design and advertising. Keep your message simple, keep your design ideas simple, and you’ll get better results. I know that this isn’t the easiest thing to do on a regular basis, but when you can it usually works.

This is an excellent example of keeping it simple and getting real world results. The goal was to get companies to shut off the lights to support Earth Hour. So Leo Burnett’s Manila Philippines office came up with this clever little solution. They sent yellow candles to the CEO’s and business leaders of major companies in the Philippines. Each candle was contained in a box, that looked like a building with its lights on. When the candle is removed, the lights switch off. There is a small amount of copy directing them to help support Earth Hour and turn off the lights in their buildings to help reduce global warming.

The results; Corporate support increased by 260% from the previous year, helping to make the Philippines the top participant of Earth Hour in 2009 with 650 towns and cities turning off their lights for Earth Hour.

Executive Creative Directors: Richard Irvine, Raoul Panes
Creative Director/Designer: Alvin Tecson
Art Director/Designer: Mela Advincula
Copywriters: Candice Madamba, Cey Enriquez