Live Action

“Dominoes”, No I Don’t Mean Pizza.

Power house video effects and production company Imaginary Forces have created a new spot to introduce the new Toyota fuel cell vehicle. The spot is deceptively simple, which is why I have posted the behind the scenes video first. This shows a great example of blending live action with CG effects using some very sophisticated motion control cameras. One of the things I like about the making of / behind the scenes video is the fact that they talk about the concept as much as the production. They could have just shown how the commercial was shot, but the tech is only one leg of the chair. How Imaginary Forces ties the creative, and storytelling component in is equally compelling. It’s a simple idea on the surface with many complex layers underneath.

The Rolex Way.

Rolex has launched a new online video through its YouTube channel titled “The Rolex Way”. The two minute spot features a blend of live action footage, CG, and slow motions shots, combined with creative editing, and a well written script. The clip starts with a blend of CG papers floating past what looks like a live action shot of the Rolex headquarters.This entire opening scene could all be CG but it looks like a blend of the two. Moving through to an interior shot there is a tribute to the founder before a really nice post move into the live action shot of a person forging a rolex casement, with a really nice time re-mapped shot of hot molten steel hitting the crucible  before  swinging back to the pages of rRolex history and more solid CG work. This is a really well thought out spot with nice camera moves, timing, and a script that reinforces the brand, the quality of the product and the dedication to producing some of the worlds finest time pieces.  Nice work for the folks at Rolex.

Rice Krispies Dinosaurs.

If you ever wonder what it takes to get a TV commercial produced, take a look at the credit list below this Rice Krispies spot by Hornet. It’s insane. Actually it’s not. It’s simply proof that good work, sometimes takes more than a few, and collaboration and team work produce some killer results. Directed by Yves Geleyn, who helped to create “The Bear and the Hare” for John Lewis is at it again creating a light hearted, fun spot that features hand crafted and animated wooden puppets. The entire piece is narrated by a young boy who brings his imaginative story to life with the help of his small dinosaur friends.

Director: Yves Geleyn
Produced by: Hornet
Executive Producer: Jan Stebbins
Producer: Cathy Kwan
Live Action Puppet Shoot Producer: Joel Kretschman
Live Action Producer: Jennifer Pearlman
Editor: Anita Chao

PUPPET SHOOT
Produced by: Hornet
Director of Photography: Ivan Abel
Art Director: Elise Ferguson
Fabricators: Nathan Aquith, Erika Bettencourt, Hillary Barton, Eric Duke, Peter Erickson, Jon Hartman, Ben Kress, Tim McDonald
Puppeteers: Tyler Bunch, Billy Barkhurst, David Feldman, Steven Widerman
1st AC: Emilie Jackson
Motion Control Operator: Don Canfield
DIT: Roman France
Gaffer: Michael Yetter
Best Boy: Jarrod Kloiber
Key Grip: Casey Wooden
2nd Grip: Matt Cryan
VTR Operator: Jon Osterman
Script Supervisor: Stephanie Andreou
Production Assistants: Milton Katz, Stevie Weinstein-Foner
Intern: Jon Hartman

POST-PRODUCTION
Produced by: Hornet Inc
Storyboard Artist: Carlos Ancalmo
Background Design: Bryan Lashelle
Character Designers: Andres Guierrez Torres, Sylvain Marc
Animatic Animators: Michelle Higa, David Hill
Supervising Technical Director: Sang Jin Bae
Technical Director: Ylli Orana
Tracking, Lighting & Rendering: Richard Kim
Modeling & Texturing: Ylli Orana, Richard Kim
CG Animator: Sean Thorpe
Compositors: Lee Gingold, John Harrison

LIVE ACTION
Produced by: Hornet
Director of Photograpy: Russell Swanson
2nd AD: Brock Lee
AC: Dave Turner
Art Director: Scott Sicari
Food Stylist: Brian Croney
Wardrobe Stylist: Kristen Robertiello
Hair/Makeup: Jacob Geraghty
Asst Makeup: Chelsea Reiss
Prop Master: Michael Sicari
Prop Assistants: Nick Horton, James Quinn
Gaffer: Gary Haspel
Best Boy: Chris Bucior
Genny Driver: Bryan Rubin
Key Grip: Derek Murphy
Best Boy: Sal Carole
Production Supervisor: Marc Kelly
Production Manager: Jessica O’Brieni
DIT: Doug Anderson
Script Supervisor: Renee Van Dorn
VTR: Jon Charity
Truck Driver: Jason D’Aversa
Production Assistants: Dallas Dodge, Isiah Brightly, Jamie Pizarro, Radimeus Floresvence
Music: Huma-Huma Original Music & Sound
Sound Design: Chris Turner @ Jungle Studios

GlassFin Shows How it Made the Honda Wave.

Every day people see commercials on TV, the internet, in movie theaters, their mobile handset, etc. Most of the time we never really think about the amount of work that goes into the final production of that 30 to 60 second clip. The reality is, there is a boat load of post work that is done, after a boat load of on set production work. Then there is the preproduction work, with scripts, storyboards, style frames, and more. Below are two videos that show just how much post work goes into making that commercial sexy enough to maybe get you to buy a product.

The videos from Glassfin are for the Honda Wave 110. The first shows the final directors cut of the spot. A whopping thirty seconds of video. The second shows the compositing and post production breakdown of how this was put together with live action footage, CGI, particle systems, color grading, and so much more. If you have ever been curious about what it takes to make an award winning commercial, this is an excellent example.