Olympus EP1

Laser Lights For a 3D World.

A few years ago there was this new video technology called “Flock of Birds”. Basically the way it worked was, you set up a group of cameras in a circle, connected all of them to a computer or series of computers, and allowed the computer system to trigger the camera shutters in sequence or at the same time. The result was an image sequence that made the subject look not only frozen in time, but rotating in 3D space. The effect was quite hot but way to expensive and prone to software glitches so it never gained a huge amount of popularity.

Using a similar technique, London based designer Moritz Waldemeyer created the laser light effects for pop star Ellie Goulding‘s music video “Lights”.

Using 50 Olympus EP1 cameras on a time slice rig we were able to capture Ellie within a world of 3D light design. Working with a combination of laser drumsticks, a dance table and computer programmed LED wands Waldemeyer was able to create the shot. I love that she used the EP1. I love that camera.

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The Ona Union Street Camera Bag. Sturdy, Rugged, Good Looks.

For Christmas I received a wonderful new camera bag from Ona. I had posted about this earlier, and talked about how excited I was that someone actually made a bag that didn’t look like a typical camera bag. Well, after owning the Ona Union Street Bag for 72 hours, I have just one thing to say.

Wow!

This is what I am talking about. Not only does the bag look absolutely stunning in person, it is well designed, thought out, and made of superb materials. The Union Street Bag that I got is “Ranger Tan” Waxwear canvas that is rugged and weathered looking with an antique look that is stylish as all hell. The leather straps, and metal hardware are sturdy, and well made. The interior features two padded compartments. One which is large enough to hold a 15 inch laptop, or an iPad which is what I have in mine, and then a larger compartment for your camera gear. The large compartment features standard felt covered foam dividers that can be repositioned to hold your precious cameras and lenses in place and allow for easy retrieval, when needed.

This case is perfect for a day trip, vacation, or any travel that doesn’t require extensive amounts of gear.  I have my Olympus Ep1, 2 additional lenses, flash, spare battery, Pansonic Lumix, and spare batteries all tucked into the main compartment with my iPad secured right behind them. In the zip pocket on the front of the bag, I was able to get the iPhone in, extra HDSC cards, my camera connection kit, a note pad, and a couple of pens. In other words there is plenty of room for basic shooting needs. Although the gear I have loaded is smaller, the interior of this bag is spacious enough for a full-sized DSLR, lenses and attachments.

The bag is light weight and feels great on your shoulder. My only wish is that the strap was about 10 inches longer in total. When it is fully extended, it is still just a bit to short for my 6 foot 4 inch frame.

Using this bag will be the ultimate test, but for now I am really satisfied with the look and feel of it, and I think it has tons of potential. Over the next few months I’ll be using it on a daily basis, and when I have more feedback, I’ll post another review/update.

Design Friday. Photography by Irene Suchocki

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Last week I found the photography of Irene Suchocki by chance while looking up some information on Lens Baby systems for my EP1. After seeing a couple of her photos I jumped over to her Flickr stream and was absolutely blown away by her work. One of the things that I love about her stuff is the atmospheric qualities she manages to capture, and the faded dream like qualities that are represented in her work.

Canadian Irene Suchocki is a self-taught freelance photographer that uses a variety of styles and techniques, both in-camera and in her digital darkroom o achieve her signature look.

All of the shots are masterfully composed, and when I started looking into the additional information about her shots I noticed that a large portion of them are being shot on her Canon EOS 5D with a EF24-70mm f/2.8L or 200mm lens. She is managing to achieve the shallow depth of field and concentrated focus by carefully manipulating her aperture, and exposure settings.

According to her web site, “Faithfully capturing a scene is less important than finding that little bit of mystery, evoking a certain mood, or telling a story.”

Her work has appeared on numerous book covers, on television, and has been exhibited at the Sundance Film Festival.

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

Irene Suchocki Photography © 2010

The Christmas Snowstorm of 2009

Late Christmas Eve the rain flipped over to snow and gave us the gift of 10 inches of White Christmas in the morning. Over the last 2 days it has pretty much snowed non-stop, and I have been doing a lot of shoveling. My driveway, my neighbors, mine again, sidewalks, digging out the neighbors car last night. So today, I decided to snap a few pics with the EP1 and the Lens Baby attachment.

Olympus EP1 PEN, Low Light Shooting Test

Over the weekend I did a little experimenting with the EP1 with a low light shooting test. All the shots were set at ISO 300, and shot using natural light coming from just the blue LED’s on the Christmas tree. The camera was set at 1/80th of a second with an aperture of f4.5 for the light and ornament shots, and 1/8th of a second at f4.5 for the overhead shots of the ceiling. The results are a bit on the noisy side, but over all I’m impressed that the sluggish auto focus could actually grab anything in these conditions. I’m also rather impressed with the amount of detail in some of the areas highlighted by the LED’s. I cropped these to 1024 by 768 from the original 4032 by 2272 pixel size to manage the upload to the blog. I’ll try to get the full-sized images out on my Flickr photostream later today.