Painting

The End Of The World Is Coming. Lets Study Some Art.

In a world where everything seems to be going to hell in a hand basket, and science is predicting the end of life in the next great mass extinction, it’s nice to know that there is art in the world. The world might be coming to an end at some point in the future, but you still have a chance to educate yourself about art thanks to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum loading 205 free art history books to the Internet Archive, all of which are available as PDF’s or ePub books.  Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.

Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.  Just be sure and pick up a solar powered charger for your phone or tablet so you can keep reading them after the power grid fails.

For the last 5 years, theGuggenheim has been digitizing its exhibition catalogs and art books, placing the results online. So if you want to study some art history this is the right place.  The collection also includes catalogs of retrospective exhibitions on masters like Paul Klee, Robert Rauschenberg, and Mark Rothko. Or you can explore older art with Chinese art in the 20th centurycraftsmen of ancient Perusculpture and works on paper or  Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection: From Picasso to Pollock. What better way to spend your time when you aren’t trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world.

Remember it is the arts and culture that separate us from the animals. Well that and opposable thumbs, larger brain capacity, the ability to create advanced tools, and a few other things.

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Here Comes Summer. Lets Go Swimming.

It is the first day of summer in the Northern Hemisphere. Summer officially began at 6:34 p.m. EDT, and what better way to celebrate than by showing a series of paintings that capture one of summers official past times, swimming. The paintings below are from a series of swimming figures painted by Colombian illustrator and painter Pedro Covo. Covo was born in Cartagena de Indias – Colombia, graduated from Visual Arts in the Javeriana University of Bogota in 2011. The figurative paintings capture the figures as they are obscured by the splashes and movement of the water rendered in frenetic splatters of paint, bold strokes, and sinuous line that seems to melt into the deep blues, greens and gray’s of the water itself. There is a dream like quality to each of them that really appeals to me, an almost abstract quality that allows you to get lost in each painting. I’d love to see these in person, since your computer screen leaves out so many details.

Covo most recently exhibited at Río Laboratorio, and has has been shown internationally  since 2013. We are in the midst of an early summer heatwave here inn the midwest and these make me want to take the day off and head to the pool.

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Money, Money, Money.

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Why is it that almost all foreign currency looks so much better than the American dollar? I’m not bashing the buck, but from a design perspective, to me foreign currency is simply more visually interesting than the American greenback. Case in point, the currency of the year awarded by The International Bank Note Society for the New Zealand for its $5 polymer note. The design features the face of New Zealand native mountain climber Sir Edmund Hillary, with a backdrop of Mount Cook and, a yellow-eyed penguin seemingly printed with what looks like metallic gold foil.

Now, with that said, I don’t think this is an award winning piece of design in the true sense. It is busy, and burdened with an abundance of imagery, and various patterns, but if you look at it in terms of a contemporary painting or print, it’s quite successful. I know that the reason for the patterns, color, overprints, and such are due to security issues and a need to foil counterfeiters, but this is something I might hang on a wall, and that is often the case for foreign currency with me. I’m not going to do that with American currency.

For more about the competition you can find it in this article at theguardian.com along with a video. And below are some additional curency examples.

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Truck Art!

Art collector and businessman Jaime Colsa has come up with a way to bring art to the people every day. He is using trucks, as in semi’s as canvasses to showcase the latest trends in painting, drawing and urban art in Spain. For Colsa the trucks challenge each artist to deal with scale, budgets and other obstacles that they had probably not dealt with before.  They are also challenged with the fact the canvas is moving, rendering each work a fleeting moment for it’s audience. It’s a great idea. Get the art out of the gallery space, expose thousands of people to it, and challenge artists to work in a new way. I wish someone would bring this same kind of program over from Europe to the USA.

“emulsifier” – Thomas Medicus

This is fantastic. “emulsifier” is a hand painted glass sculpture by Thomas Medicus. The anamorphic object is made out of 160 glass strips. There isn’t a whole lot of detail on his website, but the video and stills below give you a pretty good idea of how this works, and would look in real life. I can’t imagine how long it took to put this together and the painstaking task of hand painting each strip and assembling it. This is a very, very cool piece of art.

 

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World Leading Hipsters.

Amit Shimoni has created a series of images reimagining famous world leaders as hipsters. The “Hipstory Collection”, curates a selection of famous politicians and revolutionaries viewed through the lens of hipster hair styles, fashion, and trends. The funny thing is, Abe Lincoln already looks like a hipster in most of the photos of him. 

In addition to Lincoln, Shimoni gives us Nelson Mandela with a Hawaiian print shirt and a retro fade haircut, Winston Churchill in suspenders, a striped shirt and hipster hat, Mahatma Gandhi in tie-dye with some John Lennon-style shades, Che Guevara with an Adidas beanie, JFK with a pencil mustache and signature hipster hair cut, Margaret Thatcher and more. 

The illustrations are available in everything from stretched canvasses to iPhone cases. 

Cement Truck Murals by Andrea Bergart.

This morning while I was searching for a completely unrelated item I came across this video on Vimeo about artist Andrea Bergart and a project she was working on about a year ago. The short film looks at how she transformed cement trucks in New York into rolling murals that feature her brightly colored, geometric works. It’s a great idea, and one that she talks about in the film. Why hadn’t anyone thought about painting cement trucks before and turning them into rolling murals? The short film by  and Simon Biswas has a really nice quality to it. High production value, nice 70’s inspired soundtrack, casual, fresh and informative.