Panorama

70,000 Shots = 1, 365 Gigapixel Image.

OK this is just crazy. The video below shows the behind the scenes. The image below is a panorama compiled from 70,oo0 single shots.

Pano 2

Shooting for 15 days and taking 2 months to complete the 365 gigapixel image is described as the world’s highest definition panoramic photograph. The images were shot on a Canon 70D with a 400 mm lens and a 2x tele-converter.

The project is titled in2white and was led by Italian photographers Filippo Blengini and Alessandra Bacchilega, which took their team to an altitude of 11,482ft to make this happen. Working in freezing temperatures the managed to create an epic image of the Italian Alps and the surrounding landscape. In order to pull this off the programmed a Clauss precision pan-and-tilt head which was able to accurately position to create the seamless image below. For the full experience go to the website here.

Back in the Saddle.

After five days at Rocky Mountain National Park I’m finding it hard to get back into the swing of things.  Over the course of that five day period I spent 3 days hiking about 25 miles and and taking photos along the way. As the mini vacation wound down, I was hitting my stride and really wished for a couple more days in the park to shoot additional photos and hopefully see a bit more wildlife.

While there, I focused on using two lenses as my primary shooting tools. The Zuiko 17mm f1.8 prime, and the Zuiko 75 to 300mm f4.8 zoom. The 17 was used as a general purpose lens and the 75 to 300 for grabbing distance shots of wildlife in the park. The shots below were all shot as Olympus RAW files that were opened via Adobe Bridge with enhancements being done to the RAW data before opening the file. Once in Photoshop, files were cropped and in some cases merged to create the ultra-wide panoramas.

I’m not going to go into any kind of in-depth review of the two lenses. There is plenty of information on both of them all over the internet, and most give a much more technical review then I ever would. What I will say is this. I rented the 17 to try it out. I’ll be buying it. Hands down it was one of the best primes I’ve shot with on the OMD. I wish we would have had cloudless nights, because I wanted to try it for star trails. Maybe next time. The 17 is a fast focusing, super sharp, ultra quiet lens. The snap ring manual focusing sold it. As for the 75 to 300. It’s a solid lens, but it is by no means a best in class. For the money it was worth every penny. The photos below that were shot with it are annotated with approximate distances to show just how much reach this lens has.

Distance of about 30 feet with the focal length set to about 200mm.

Distance of about 30 feet with the focal length set to about 200mm.

Distance of about 50 yards with a focal length of 300mm. OMD in Black and White mode.

Distance of about 50 yards with a focal length of 300mm. OMD in Black and White mode.

Three images shot with the 17mm merged in Photoshop to create the final composite.

Three images shot with the 17mm merged in Photoshop to create the final composite.

Three images shot with the 17mm merged in Photoshop to create the final composite.

Three images shot with the 17mm merged in Photoshop to create the final composite.

Distance of about 75 yards with the focal length at 300mm.

Distance of about 75 yards with the focal length at 300mm.

17mm at the closest focusing point of about 8 inches

17mm at the closest focusing point of about 8 inches

The 17.

For over a year I have been thinking about picking up the Zuiko 17mm f1.8 lens from Olympus, but never pulled the trigger. I decided before the trip to Estes Park that I should rent the lens from Borrow Lenses and evaluate if it would be worth the investment. I’ve been shooting with it off and on for the last three days, and I’ve decided. It’s time to buy. This lens has been a pure wonder. It’s super sharp, has great bokeh when wide open, and is completely versatile. From candid portraits, to landscapes, to panoramas, the lens can handle it all. Tonight’s test provide the clouds hold back, star trails.

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iOS7 Panoramic Backgrounds.

Apple is set to release the latest flavor of iOS later this summer, and it is packed with all sorts of new features. One of the features that is a bit of a gimmick, but still pretty fun is the panorama background images. In iOS 7 you can use any panoramic photo as a background that will scroll as you move the phone, creating a floating background that feels a bit more alive and dynamic. The video below shows it in action.