Poetry

This Panda is Dancing

Remember life before your smartphone, tablet, and social media? Yeah I know, it’s kind of hard to imagine not being constantly connected anymore. The video below from Max Stossel & Sander van Dijk is a poetic send up about how we have all become addicted to that piece of tech sitting in your hand right now, or waiting to be retrieved from your pocket as soon as you put down whatever tech you are looking at now.

The video itself is great. A nice live action short with really well thought out graphics that have been motion tracked to specific source points in the frame. Solid editing and post work really help to polish this, but the real meat is in the message. A message with a direct call to action at the timewellspent.io website. The blurb before the video pretty much sums up what they are about.

Today apps and media compete in a race to grab our attention. Join a movement to:

  • Live better with more empowering settings for our media and devices.
  • Change incentives so media competes to improve our lives, not get eyeballs.
  • Invent new interfaces that help us to make room for what matters.

A poetic short film by Max Stossel & Sander van Dijk:

In the Attention Economy, technology and media are designed to maximize our screen-time. But what if they were designed to help us live by our values? timewellspent.io

What if news & media companies were creating content that enriched our lives, vs. catering to our most base instincts for clicks?
What if social platforms were designed to help us create our ideal social lives, instead of to maximize time-on site and “likes”?
What if dating apps measured their success in how well they helped us find what we’re looking for instead of in # of swipes?

As technology gets more and more engaging, and as AI and VR become more and more prevalent in our day-to-day lives we need to take a look at how we’re structuring our future.

Time Well Spent is a movement to align technology with our humanity: timewellspent.io

Director, Co-producer, & Visual Effects: Sander van Dijk: sandervandijk.tv

Writer, Co-producer & Lead Actor: Max Stossel: maxstossel.com

Production Company: Yacht Club Films

Director of Photography: Conor Murphy

Color: RCO

Music & Sound Design: Wesley Slover –

Steadicam Operator: Kyle Fasanella

Graphic Artist: Aaron Kemnitzer

CG Artist: Joseph Pistono

Visual Effects Assistant: Chelsea Galen

Roto Assistant: Regina Morgan-Munoz

Lead Actress: Crystal Lee

“Undersong”, Motionpoems.

Matt Smithson, and Man vs Magnet directed and produced “Undersong” for Motionpoems. The animated short is built around the adapted poem by Stacey Lynn Brown, and dedicated to Jake Adam York. The short is voiced by Yaa Asantewa, with additional sound design by Sound Lounge. Asantewa’s voice guides you through the story accompanied by a score from Joshua Smoak. The hand drawn animation is timed perfectly to the voice over and the visuals draw you into the story so well. I’ve watched this over and over noticing small details that I missed with each viewing. It’s a great way to lose yourself for a few minutes on a summer afternoon.

Wayne the Stegosaurus. A Motion Poem.

It’s Friday. Enjoy.

Credits:

The Mill
Co-Directors: Aran Quinn, Jeff Dates
3D Lead Aritsts: Rob Petrie, Jeff Dates
Producer: Jason Bartnett
EP: Danielle Amaral

“Cloths of Heaven”. Seb Lester’s Calligraphic Masterpiece.

There was a time not to long ago when people actually had good hand writing. Taught in primary school, practiced for hours, good penmanship was king. Slowly though, over the last twenty or so years it has begun to dissolve. Why write by hand? Why write in cursive? Why practice the art of creating letterforms by hand when you can type, touch or talk, and have your primary communication device correct your spelling on the fly. Don’t get me wrong I am not anti-technology. I am however in love with beautifully crafted hand lettering that demonstrates the craft of a dying art form. Thanks to people like lettering artist  the art form stays alive and well. Hopefully his work will encourage others to take up a pen and create with ink on paper.

Cloths of Heaven’ is Lester’s interpretation of “Aedh Wishes for the Cloths of Heaven”, by renowned Irish poet William Butler Yeats. The video shows the creation of a the master art for a serigraph poster, which was also translated into a limited edition embroidery piece via The London Embroidery Studio. The attention to detail, and the craftsmanship that went into this is outstanding. It is a continuation of his exploration of the theme of beauty in the context of letterform design, and the mastery of the calligraphic arts. Big hat tip to .

“Yeats’s poem references ‘embroidered cloths’ and ‘gold and silver threads’, so I wanted to try to make the screen print look like an exquisite and timelessly beautiful piece of highly ornamental needlework. I’ve drawn from Medieval, Renaissance and 18th-century sources but I have also tried to integrate personal, progressive and irreverent flourishing ideas. The result is a hybrid stylistic treatment that I think could only exist in the 21st century.”

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An Animated Poem. “Illustration (The Finest Occupation)”

Do you like to draw? Do you like to paint? Do you like poetry? Things that rhyme? Pen and ink? any or all of these? If you answered “Yes”, then the video below is for you. Seriously. An animated poem of pen and ink art about illustration. Simple, and fun for a late, late winter/early early spring day.

Subway Cento. Subway Poetry from Jack Cheng

Jack Cheng creates wonderful poems from fragments of New York subway signs. The poetry created from these snippets of advertising, is a visually wonderful cacophony of letter forms and colors. The poems themselves are modern balance of editorial with and insight. I’ve posted a few images below, but its worth your time to go to Cheng’s website and have a look at all of them.

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Between Page and Screen. A Book of Augmented Reality Poems.

Over the last couple of years I have seen a ton of augmented reality stuff. Most of it is geared toward a camera enabled smartphone, and most of it is designed to extend a product offering or promote something.A lot of it is pretty mediocre in design, and implementation.

It is refreshing to see an augmented reality application that is being used to help create a literary experience. One that is well designed, well constructed, and well thought out.

Between Page and Screen was written by Amaranth Borsuk and developed by Brad Bouse. The book is a series of poems that are displayed on the page as geometric patterns that reveal the text when shown to w computer with a web camera, or a camera enabled smartphone.

Originally produced as a limited-edition hand-bound and letterpress-printed artist’s book, Between Page and Screen has been shown internationally at a number of exhibitions from San Francisco to Berlin, and is now available as a hardbound book on the Between Page and Screen website from Siglio Press.

“The pages of this artist’s book contain no text—only abstract geometric patterns and a web address leading to this site, where the book may be read using any browser and a webcam. The poems that appear, a series of letters written by two lovers struggling to map the boundaries of their relationship, do not exist on either page or screen, but in the augmented space between them opened up by the reader.”