Poster Design

Infographics to geek out over.

I love a good infographic, and when they are executed by illustrators like Matt Taylor, Tom Whalen, and Kevin Tong you know they are gonna be amazing. Below are just a few of the geeky images that these three (info-rama) have teamed up with Mondo to do an art show specifically about infographics. Not just any infographics. Infographics for your inner geek, ranging from Star Wars, to Batman, to the Avengers and beyond. If you live in Austin, you might want to head over to Mondo Gallery on June 24 at 7pm for the Inforama opening. It looks like it is going to be a pretty fun show.

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Stellavie, Movie Director Portrait’s Remind Me of the Classics.

If you haven’t seen the movie 2013 Drew: The Man Behind the Poster I highly recommend it. If you aren’t familiar with the artist that is the subject of the film, you’ll definitely recognize his work since he produced pretty much every block buster movie poster from the 1970’s through 90’s. That brings me to the subject of this post. A series of posters produced by German design studio Stellavie. The posters are portraits of famous movie directors done in that classic movie poster style. Each 16 by 20 inch poster is done up in glorious black and white, and they are absolutely brilliant. The illustration style, composition, the way they capture the essence of each director and the movies they produced. There are a total of 6,Alfred Hitchcock Martin Scorsese David Lynch Quentin Tarantino Stanley Kubrick Tim Burton, and they are all equally great. I kind of want all of them. The posters were developed by Stellavie in close collaboration with Julian Rentzsch. Each is produced on  beautiful cotton paper stock that captures Rentzsch’s drawing and illustration skills. The original art is a blend analogue and digital, that works together so well. It makes me wish the big studios that did away with classic movie poster styles would go back to the look of the golden age.

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Friday Inspiration. Zim&Zou for IBM.

A little Friday inspiration from Zim & Zou. The magnificent posters were created for Ogilvy for a poster campaign for IBM back in 2013. Photographed by Fabrice Fouillet, the sculptures are built from cut paper and fabric. There is solid attention to detail paired with smart copy, and solid backgrounds in vibrant colors. The result is a really nice campaign that gets translated into a series of animated gif’s. Below are the posters, a few of the gif files and some detail shots. For the complete series, click here.

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

cannes posters_DEEP DIVES_color version

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IBM Destail 1

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IBM Detail 3

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IBM Detail 6

Steve Frykholm’s Picnic Posters for Herman Miller.

This just put a huge smile on my face. Produced by Dress Code this is the story of Steve Frykholm, Herman Miller’s first in-house graphic designer. Frykholm stayed with Herman Miller for 44 years working on internal projects for the company. One of his favorites, and the subject of this film, are the posters he created for the annual company picnic. This is the story of how the posters came to be, and their induction into the Museum of Modern Art. I love how Frykholm’s laid back attitude about how these came to be runs in stark contrast to the creative process of the digital age. There is no way a committee could have deluded his concepts with an endless sea of changes, revisions, and interjections. Because of it, the posters Frykholm created are as fresh and original today, as they were when he started making them in 1970.

 

Flowing Dimensional Type from Pawel Nolbert

“Atypical Typography” from Warsaw based artist and designer Pawel Nolbert, is a series of posters that explore the form, rhythm, and flow of letter forms. The posters are a created from sculptural elements  that are figurative illustrations designed to capture the expressive nature of writing.  Each of the elements were built from artistic, painterly gestures that were formed, then photographed to create the final B1 sized print at 8100 x 8100 pixels at 300DPI. What a great look. Frankly I’d like to have one of the original sculptures used to make the final image. Nolbert’s impressive client list includes Google, Adobe, Sony, Nike, Chrysler, Nepresso, and more. There are more examples of his work at the link above.

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20 Rules. The H-57 Commandments for Designers.

Milan creative studio H-57’s staff set out earlier this year to create a set of rules, or guidelines to determine what guides them every day. The fact is that most of these could be applied to any occupation.

To create the poster, the H-57 crew determined their personal guidelines, drew them on paper, cut them out, and glued them to a sheet of cardboard. Then the entire sheet was converted to what you see below.

In the end, these rules are what really should guide us every single day.

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The Master. Tom Eckersley, Poster Design

One of the greatest poster designers of the 20th century had to be Tom Eckersley. Yesterday afternoon while doing a little inspiration and research gathering for a freelance project I stumbled across a series of his work and just stopped. Eckersley’s legacy is one that stands out with a rich illustration style that translated so well to the design work he did for such giants as Shell, Guinness  Gillette, BBC, Austin Reed, The united Nations and so many more. His career spanned almost six decades during which time his output was prolific. Over his career his style would change, but Eckersley’s designs have one common factor: his work brought together images and editorial that transformed complex messages into easily recognized, and understandable forms of communication.

Below is a small sampling of his work. Now then, I think I am going to have to add a couple books to my design library.

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