Printing

Think Ink.

Designers that work with print, hopefully think about ink on a regular basis. Ink is the primary vehicle used to complete your printed vision. No matter what your work looks like on screen, the way it is printed, the paper it’s printed on, and the quality of the ink used will impact the final outcome. The video below isn’t new. It actually came out about 6 years ago, but it’s worth watching.

This short film by The Printing Ink Company in Canada takes you through the process, techniques and craft of ink creation. That’s right, the “Craft”, because making ink is a complex process requiring skills and experience to get the best results. The Printing Ink Company shares their methods used to create every color in the PANTONE spectrum and beyond. The challenges they face getting it right, and the attention to detail they put into making every can of ink.

This is a must watch for art students, designers and everyone else in the business that is designing printed materials.

Alphabets of Wood.

alphabetswood_fullI’ll admit it, I’m a type junkie. I have been for a long time, and there is no 12 step program to cure me of this affliction. It’s part of being a graphic designer, and someone who has spent the better part of his adult life playing with, using and building with typography to create something new and unique.

This morning when I was out on the Hamilton Wood Type Museum website (yes there is a museum dedicated to wood typography) I came across a book for sale that will be going into my reference stack asap.

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“Alphabets of Wood. Luigi Melchiori and the history of Italian wood type” is the most recent addition to the latest wave of books dedicated to the history of wood type used in printing presses before digital, and before metal type became the standards of the day. It is also the first book to seriously look at the historical and cultural significance of Italian wood type manufacturers of the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

“This book sprung from an encounter with the life and work of Luigi Melchiori, a skilled craftman who lived and worked during the late ninteenth and early twentieth centuries in Crespano del Grappa – a small community at the foothills of the Alps in the Veneto Region. It is a tribute to a maker of alphabets of wood. The authors, James Clough and Chiara Scattolin, develop a private and professional artist’s profile, the history of the wood type and its progressive use in typography. The archive “Luigi Melchiori” is part of Tipoteca Italiana’s collections.”

 

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1-of-1 Porsche’s and More.

As someone who’s formal eduction, training and work experience is in the filed of art and graphic design, I have a profound appreciation for the work of 1-of-1. The posters shown below have a flattened refined look that will stand the test of time. The visual simplicity highlights the car’s silhouette . There is just enough detail to keep things visually interesting without detracting from the aesthetic of the automobile, or the overall visual design. Limited color pallets and flat graphics help to enhance the overall feel of the posters themselves. The designer has worked closely with each client to capture personal details that really make each print one of a kind.

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1-of-1 is the brain child of Australian designer Steve Schenko and it grew out of the creation of a one off print of one of his advertising clients Porsche 911 GT3. That single poster caught the eye of a number of automotive enthusiasts and the rest is history. Well history in the making since he is just starting out. Right now Schenko is open to taking commissions on poster designs for your personal automotive or motorcycle baby. The posters are one of a kind images printed on 310GSM artist stock paper, and signed by the artist.

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How To Make A Book.

Most of us don’t really think about what goes into making a book when we pick one up. The beautifully shot and edited video below shows in exquisite detail the art of making a book by hand. This video has such a nice look to it, and it really let’s you appreciate the craftsmanship of something made by hand.

Portrait of a Letterpress Printer.

This put a smile on my face for a number of reasons. First off it is a really nice documentary short. Beautiful cinematography and editing. Solid story line and an interesting character. An insight into the wisdom that one gets from years of creativity. And then there is the portion of the film, where Mr. William Amer comes full circle to rediscover his passion and spread it to others. Love this little film. Great work from

Made by Hand at Adams of Rye.

Back in the day, when I was in art school… I just made myself sound really old… anyway, I took quite a few printmaking classes. I was really into the process of Lithography and intaglio printmaking. There was a solid satisfaction in the creation process and the slowness in which an image was produced.

At one point I discovered letter press and I had an instant connection to it. In part it came from the fact that I was working part time as a designer and paste up artist to help pay for school. I think the connection between the typesetting component, and the printing process is what brought it all together for me.

The video below by Leo Cackett was produced for  for Wallpaper* magazine. It features Derek Stonham, and Ian Foster producing a wood type printed piece for the cover of the 2012 May issue of the magazine. At one point in the voice over by Foster, he talks about working with antique machinery and type. This is so true. The press is probably over 100 years old, as well as the wood type they are using. I love the fact that there is a dedicated group of people all over the world that are keeping this craft alive. It really rings true with me after spending 10 hours in front of a computer screen working in Photoshop and Illustrator.

Love Letters for Hamilton Type.

When the good people at Mama’s Sauce in Orlando Florida found out that the Hamilton Type Museum were being forced to relocate, they did something extraordinary. They culled the talents of some extremely skilled designers to help raise money for the Hamilton move. The video below tells the story of who what and why. The video is worth watching in its own right. The cause makes it even better.

Letters: mamas-sauce.com/shop/love-letters/
Hamilton Type: woodtype.org/support

Designers:

Fuzzco (fuzzco.com/)
Justin Mezzell (justinmezzell.com/)
Aaron Draplin (draplin.com/)
Dana Tanamachi (tanamachistudio.com/)
Jon Contino (joncontino.com/)
Jessica Hische (jessicahische.is/)
Ross Moody 55HI’s (55his.com/)

Music by: Keegan Dewitt keegandewitt.com/