Publishing

Birth of a Book, A Short Film by Glen Milner.

This wonderful video by Glen Milner for the Telegraph is a great example of timing with editing, and story telling only with visuals. Even if you know nothing about the printing and publishing industry, you get the complexities from watching this.

Milner’s short film, shows off the craft of printing and binding a book by hand. A craft that is in many ways a dying art form in this ages of pixels and e-books. (At the beginning there is a shot of rubylith overlays being placed over a piece of film. When was the last time you thought of that?)

Through the entire film, there is a rhythm, created by the edits that guide you through the entire process from burning plates, to numbering the limited edition. The film is only two minutes long, yet it goes through the entire process.

“Birth of a Book” has a great score, a great look, and really solid editing.

Shot at Smith-Settle Printers, Leeds, England. The book being printed is Suzanne St Albans’ ‘Mango and Mimosa’ published as part of the Slightly Foxed series.

Shot, Directed & Edited by Glen Milner

An Edible Cookbook Promotion.

Korefe has designed and produced what they are calling the “First and only Cookbook you can read and eat”. With pages made from sheet pasta, that have been embossed with text, that claim might be right.

The book is made out sheets of fresh pasta which can be opened and read. The book doesn’t come with any additional ingredients, but with a little imagination you could quickly turn this into a tasty dinner. Packaged as classic lasagne, the Cookbook was designed as a special project for a large German publishing house.

This is a pretty clever promotional idea. An idea that definitely leaves an impression and remains memorable long after the book has been read and hopefully consumed. I wish there was more information at the Korefe site on the design team, but unfortunately I didn’t see anything.

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Informotion, Animated Infographics from Gestalten

When it comes to making infographics, there really is a set of fundamental principals you should follow to make them work. This is even more true when they are going to be animated. The science of infographics goes beyond collating information, and organizing it with nice illustrations and icons.

Gestalten is quite aware of this, and they will soon be releasing “Informotion, Animated Infographics” here in the US. Edited by Tim Finke, Sebastian Manger, Stefan Fichtel, this book looks like an essential for anyone that animates information, or creates motion graphics. The 208 page book is filled with color illustrations, and information on design. Each book contains a unique log-in code for accessing a wide selection of animated information graphics as well as their making-of videos online. The interplay between the detailed descriptions in the print edition and the diverse motion material makes Informotion an essential reference for students and newcomers as well as a trusty guide for design and media professionals.

Informotion is the first book to document the fundamentals needed to create compelling animated infographics and to explain them with numerous examples. It focuses on key aspects of visualizing data, current forms of information graphics, and future possibilities for moving images. The publication also outlines the factors that improve the viewer’s ability to absorb information.

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Informotion is the first reference book devoted to the fundamentals of creating compelling animated infographics. It explains key aspects of how to effectively visualize data, outlines factors that improve the viewer’s ability to absorb information, and explores both current tools and future possibilities for crafting moving images.

Each book contains a unique log-in code for accessing a wide selection of animated information graphics as well as their making-of videos online. The interplay between the detailed descriptions in the print edition—including a preface by co-editor Stefan Fichtel, who runs his own infographics studio with clients such as Porsche and National Geographic—and the diverse motion material makes Informotion an essential reference for anyone interested in working successfully with these burgeoning visual formats.