Sculpture

The End Of The World Is Coming. Lets Study Some Art.

In a world where everything seems to be going to hell in a hand basket, and science is predicting the end of life in the next great mass extinction, it’s nice to know that there is art in the world. The world might be coming to an end at some point in the future, but you still have a chance to educate yourself about art thanks to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum loading 205 free art history books to the Internet Archive, all of which are available as PDF’s or ePub books.  Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.

Yes now as you contemplate the end of the world and hone your apocalypse survival skills you can bone up on the finer things and learn about Max Ernst, The Italian Metamorphosis, French Art in the 1970’s, Joseph Cornell, Francis Bacon, Pop Art in the 60’s and so much more.  Just be sure and pick up a solar powered charger for your phone or tablet so you can keep reading them after the power grid fails.

For the last 5 years, theGuggenheim has been digitizing its exhibition catalogs and art books, placing the results online. So if you want to study some art history this is the right place.  The collection also includes catalogs of retrospective exhibitions on masters like Paul Klee, Robert Rauschenberg, and Mark Rothko. Or you can explore older art with Chinese art in the 20th centurycraftsmen of ancient Perusculpture and works on paper or  Masterpieces from the Guggenheim Collection: From Picasso to Pollock. What better way to spend your time when you aren’t trying to survive in a post-apocalyptic world.

Remember it is the arts and culture that separate us from the animals. Well that and opposable thumbs, larger brain capacity, the ability to create advanced tools, and a few other things.

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Creatures of the Deep

When I first watched this video on Vimeo, I was drawn in by the fantastic cinematography, and the atmosphere that is created in Alan Williams studio. The visuals hooked me but as his story, and discussion about process unfolded, I knew I was here for the full 8-minute duration. After watching it with the sound on, I muted the audio and watched it again, full screen and really looked at the way this was shot, edited, and composed. Ben Cox does a really nice job of framing his shots and using shallow depth of field to focus the viewer on specific elements within the frame. Lighting and color grading come together to really help enhance the story and create a mood that captures Alan Williams personality and the artwork he creates. This short has such a solid look, and great story hooks as well, it’s definitely going in the visual reference library for inspiration at a later date.

“Velo”, or Chair Porn. Not That Kind of Porn. Get your Mind out the Gutter.

It’s been awhile since I have posted any chair porn, so here you go. Velo designed by Jan Waterston is a solid example of how taking a good creative concept and executing properly can reinvent an ordinary item creating intriguing beauty.

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The chair has been redefined by Waterson as a sinuous piece of furniture with a sculptural, yet inviting presence. It is a demonstration of  master craftsmanship and creativity as it becomes a flowing form that wraps around the seated form. When not in use it is an object of art, a sculptural piece of wood that is visually dynamic, even though it is a static object.

Waterson says the beauty the chair was  inspired by the flowing forms of bicycles, “This relationship between body and object is echoed in bicycle design with tubes flowing seamlessly into one another, constantly changing shape, to improve function and aesthetic”. 

Velo is hand sculpted from ash and features seamless construction, which is a testament to the Waterson’s woodworking skills Each element of the chair blend into one another, making the Velo seem as though it is crafted from a single piece of wood.

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Complex Meshes.

For Lumiere Durham 2015, England’s largest light festival, French artist Miguel Chevalier has unveiled his latest art installation “Complex Meshes”, at centuries old Durham Cathedral. The cathedral was constructed at the end of the 11th Century and represents one of the most accomplished examples of Norman architecture in Europe. Complex Meshes follows Chevalier’s immersive projections at King’s College Chapel in Cambridge, and is a monumental projection mapping project that happens at dusk on the ribbed vault ceiling of the central nave.

Chevalier’s mesh is a projection of a three-dimensional object consisting of vertices, edges and faces which form polygons. The use of numerous wireframe meshes projected onto the ceiling becomes an aesthetic in itself enhancing the original mesh structure of the original Gothic architecture.

Chevalier uses different colored weaving patterns composed of triangles, quadrilaterals and other polygons overlapping and evolving slowly in real time creating a virtual light curtain of diverse and complex shapes. The surface is deformed to generate the abstract landscapes of a living universe which is constantly evolving.

The video below takes a couple of minutes to set up the space before showing the actual projection mapping project.

 

K-1 Stationary Kit For Those Who Still Write Letters and Such.

One thing about setting up a home office is you get to search for all sorts of cool office accessories. This morning while looking for desk accessories, lamps, cable management, and bulletin boards I came across the K-1 stationary kit designed by Maxim Scherbakov. The look reminds me of the late 1970’s and early 1980’s “Memphis School” led by Etore Sottsass. According to Scherbakov the K-1 kit is based on Soviet construction toys. I love the retro vibe, and I can almost get behind the copper, but not quite. Sorry bad brass and copper fixtures from my youth have scarred me deeply and I have a hard time embracing the retro warm metal revival going on. None the less this is a beautiful set of desk accessories.

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“K-1 means “Konstruktor-1″. The name was inspired by Soviet construction toys. K-1 is a construction set for a stationery and also It has modular system with a wide range of variations. Every kit part has it’s own unique function and colaborate with each other. For instance a little casket box could transform into phone stand. All kit parts are fitting together, so anyone can build their own stationary system and than modify and playing with it. The main basis element is a pencil case and other elements are adjusted to it. All set made of maple, white marble and copper.”
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Time is Art, Art is Time.

Eindhoven-based artist Daan Spanjers has created a new way of telling time that is more of a reflection on how light changes, rather than the accuracy chronology. This series reflects on how time and light intersect through out the course of the day.

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His series of clocks, “Atmosphere” try to emulate the unpredictability of colors that appear and disappear throughout the course of the day. Spanjers is trying to single out different moments of atmospheric compositions and is attempting to collect those color combinations over time.

“By framing spectrums of colors these clocks speak of the transitional qualities of color and time.”

Spanjers looks at things like juxaposition, dust, water, geolocation and perspective to help determine specific hues, looking at everything from early-morning horizons to total darkness at midnight.

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Atmosphere is the first in a series of time piece color compositions, from Spanjers that captures time, light, and atmosphere in circular-form.

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“emulsifier” – Thomas Medicus

This is fantastic. “emulsifier” is a hand painted glass sculpture by Thomas Medicus. The anamorphic object is made out of 160 glass strips. There isn’t a whole lot of detail on his website, but the video and stills below give you a pretty good idea of how this works, and would look in real life. I can’t imagine how long it took to put this together and the painstaking task of hand painting each strip and assembling it. This is a very, very cool piece of art.

 

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