Social Advertising

MNSTR, Lacoste, The Australian Open, and the Small Screen.

If you work with video, animation, or motion graphics for advertising, or promotional materials you should probably start thinking heavily about mobile outlets and how you will deliver content. Case in point, the video below from MNSTR for Lacoste and the Australian Open. This video showcases the work MNSTR created specifically for the small screen, and even more specifically for the short time frame, touch points like Instagram and Snapchat require. Simple, short, colorful animations paired with high quality sound design help to make these work. MNSTR did their homework and got their heads wrapped around the space these would presented in and pulled it off. This series of short animations were dribbled out over the two week event helping to extend the total reach of Lacoste’s efforts. 

Land Rover on Instagram is API Genius.

Woodstone

It’s pretty amazing how brands are beginning to take advantage of the Instagram API to create compelling advertising. Landrover has launched 2 Instagram campaigns that take full advantage of the smartphone applications ability to use video and seamless image blends to create a story built around the new Landcover discovery. Developed by Y&R New York, followers engage in two fictional stories. The first follows the adventures of two brothers in Kanab Utah. The second a young couple in Sawtooth National Forest Idaho. The campaign blends amazing landscape photography that has been stitched together to create a seamless, scrollable backdrop, and short video clips from each adventure. Both stories are viewable at @SolitudeInSawtooth, @BrotherhoodOfWonderstone on Instagram. At various points users can tap on specific images to learn skills in off-road driving, survival tips, and other outdoor techniques. This is such a great form of social advertising. It is engaging, without being a hard sell. It elevates the brand in a way that makes the Landcover Discovery even more desirable, and it engages with the target audience on a very transparent level. You really should look at this on your Instagram account if you can. The website version simply doesn’t do it justice. The video below from Digital Buzz shows it in action if you don’t want to, or have the time to check it out on your Instagram account.

 

The Instagram Ikea Catalog.

here is an interesting use of Instagram in terms of advertising without feeling quite so much like an ad or an online catalog.

Ikea Russia created  an “Instagram Catalog Website” for a 34 piece designer collection of products. The Instagram account used the tagging feature to promote items and encouraged followers to share images and videos of their own Ikea PS 2014 products using the same hash tags. The campaign snagged over 15,000 followers in less than a week. With the “Instagram Catalog Website” functioning much like a microsite, the cross linking feature allowed each product to build out it’s own Instagram microsite for each product. The social sharing users generate with their own photos tagged with the product’s Instagram name allowed the campaign to go viral.

Oh and the cost was marginal for Ikea Russia.

Vertasium Explains the Facebook “Like” Fraud.

Anyone that knows me, knows that my personal engagement with Facebook has wained over the last few years as the social media giant has grown into a giant ad revenue giant. The video below from Veritasium has drawn almost a million views in the last two days. Why? because it punches a gaping hole in Facebook’s pay for “Likes” system and the  way Facebook’s pay to play promotions work. If you are a marketer, advertiser, or anyone that uses Facebook as a platform to engage with your target audience, you should watch this. What Veritasium points out is hard to deny, and the point they make about audience engagement effects you more than you know.

Ray-Ban Social Visionaries, from Animade and Stink Digital.

There is no denying the power of Facebook on the social media front. Like Facebook or not, they are the 800 pound gorilla which is why so many brands have turned to them to promote their products. Now when a company promotes something on Facebook, they can do it the wrong way or they can do it the right way. In most cases, companies advertising on Facebook do it the wrong way with an in your face sponsored ad that runs in your feed, on your wall, ignored by your trained eyes. Then there are companies that get it right, and know that if they want to promote their brand in the social media sphere they need to be a bit more subtle, a bit more fun.

Animade was asked by Stink Digital to design and produce the Ray Ban Social Visionaries Facebook app. The app connects with your information to produce a bespoke animation that bestows a ‘Visionary’ title upon you based on your usage. The animations are are built from 50 predefined sequences that are selected randomly by the app and assembled. This is a pretty impressive piece of coding as well as the animations that were created. The video below shows the overview. The videos below that are examples of what the app produced.

 

MINI Art Beat, Vine, and Rolling Social Media.

Pushing the boundaries on Social Advertising, MINI has converted a  Mini Countryman into a rolling billboard powered by Vine video streams. The Countryman is covered in thousands of LED lights arranged in a structured array on the vehicle. The LED lights are fed Vine video streams which play back on the car as it cruises the streets of London at night. Now this is a pretty inventive way to use the Twitter owned social media video site.  The entire backstory on the production, technology, and campaign can be found at the MINI Space Blog here.

Fliike it With Facebook.

Lets say you are a business and you want to let everyone walking by your space know just how popular you are on Facebook. What would you do? You could spend a boatload of money on a realtime projection system and some fancy software to display each like that you get, or you could drop $390.00 on Fliike.

Developed by Smiirl, Fliike is the first physical realtime Facebook like counter. It is connected and designed for businesses to show off the growing number of likes they receive. The preorder cost is $390.00. Smiirl is working to get a limited edition of 500 numbered Fliikes ready for the first group of preorders. The cost doesn’t include shipping or tax, so you are probably looking spending closer to 450 bucks by the time its all said and done. It’s still cheaper than hiring a coder and building a projection system for your store front window though. According to the Smiirl website, the first batch of Fliikes will ship in November, just in time for Christmas.

Fliike by Smiirl from Smiirl on Vimeo.