stop motion animation

StopMo Pro and a Cool Animation About StopMo Pro.

The National Film Board of Canada is currently offering their StopMo Pro for iPad2 software for just 99 cents. If you have any inclination toward film making and or stop motion animation this is a no brainer. Seriously. The software is a killer, easy to use tool that produces great results. Now with that said, take a look at the stop motion animation below that was made with StopMo Pro for iPad2.

“Book of Legends” Stop Motion Done Right from Second Home Studios.

Anyone who knows me, knows my pet peeves when it comes to stop motion animation. Stop motion doesn’t have to look herky jerky, old-timey, jittery. It doesn’t need fake gate weave, frame jitter, scratches, dust, vignetting, and stutter.

Case in point, this beautiful animated short for  Pilsner Urquell by Second Home Studios. The clip while obviously stop motion, has a fluid frame rate, camera movements, and flow. They didn’t junk it up with a bunch of superfluous post effects that detract from the extremely well produced visuals and the storyline.

Update: I added the behind the scenes making of video to this post.

Directed by: Chris Randall
Produced by: Chris Randall and Jim Turner

Original design/sculpture created by: Su Blackwell
Lead Modeller: Sarra Hornby
Modelmakers: Ian Whittle, Karen Richards,
Paul Doran, Natalie Bancroft, Adam Watts,
Tristan Pritchard, Jon Reynolds.

Lead Animators: Ian Whittle, Jud Walton.
Animation: Natalie Bancroft, Adam Watts,
Tristan Pritchard, Sarra Hornby, Jon Reynolds,
Chris Randall.
Motion Control Operator: Matt Cusworth
Studio Lighting/Rigging: Luke Unsworth

Post-Production: Adam Fenwick, Craig Reeves
Sound Design: Jim Turner
Voice Artist: Richard Armitage
CGI Pre-Visualisation: Character Shop

Assistant Animators/Modellers: Lauren Newman,
Lianne Allen, Scott Willets.
Runner: Liam Smyth

“It’s How We Connect”, Attention to Detail.

One of the things that I talk about when it comes to design, or any creative endeavor is attention to craft and production value.

I think one of the things that has put me off on so many stop motion pieces lately is, not a lack of production value or craft, but instead an attempt to make it look to analog. The insistence on shaky cam, or slight camera movement. Fake gate weave and frame jitter injected as an attempt to make the piece feel old school. The thing is it’s not necessary. When I see camera movement or jitter, it just makes me think the person that made the stop motion piece wasn’t paying attention to locking down their camera.

The video below by Lucinda Schreiber is a great example of stop motion done right. The animation is fluid and bright. There is no attempt to hide mistakes with post production effects. No shaky cam. No frame jitter. Just nice clean stop motion animation timed perfectly to the soundtrack. Because of this it feels fresh, unlike so many current stop motion works that feel forced. Like stop motion was used because it is the flavor of the month, instead of the correct technique for the spot.

Directed and Animated by Lucinda Schreiber
Producer: Florence Tourbier
E.P: Oliver Lawrance
Post Production: The Gingerbread Man
Art Department: Kevina-Jo Smith
Music: Sonar Music
Track: by the Bumblebeez

10,000 SIM Cards for 100,000 Likes.

The first video, shows a really nice stop motion video that Vodafone Ireland created to celebrate 100,000 likes on Facebook. The video is constructed from more than 10,000 SIM cards, and has a really nice flow to it. Whats more impressive though, is the second video that shows how they made it. If you think this kind of thing looks easy, watch video number two. It’ll change your mind.

“The Old Man and the Sea”, A Stop Motion Version of Hemmingway’s Classic.

It’s the end of the school year for most people around the globe, and with that there is a new crop of student work that is showing up on the internet. below is a post that surfaced on Vimeo by Hagen Reiling, and Marcel Schindler, students of Prof. Dr. Reiner Nachtwey, in Düsseldorf. The short stop motion film is inspired by Ernest Hemingway’s short story “The Old Man and the Sea”, and shows some skillful animation, editing and illustration.

Once again, student work that makes me wish I was back in school. The tools that are available to emerging students today is allowing them to create some really impressive work. This is no exception.

Sebas & Clim’s “Tiny Story”

Telling a story doesn’t always involve lengthy dialog, or expansive visuals. Sometimes it can be told with simple graphics, no real dialog, and a basic visual metaphors.

This is a great example of that from Sebas & Clim. Tiny Story is a series of simple statements enacted by very simple shapes animated against a grid on a primary background. Simple, and complex at the same time. Absolutely wonderful. Oh and I really love the fact that it is portrait, not landscape orientation.

Design Friday

It’s Friday and here is the fun design find of the day. Click on the images below or the highlighted links to actually see the stop motion animation. This is a great little stop motion video about how Google Street View works. Nice little story line and really nice stop motion animation.

google

google3-550x301

500x_Street_View_Japan