Tablet

Art, Copy & Code. Nike’s “Phenomenal Shot” campaign.

The business of advertising is a tricky game. You need to keep one step ahead of the competition, constantly create memorable and unique advertisements, develop those ideas across an ever expanding horizon of channels, and constantly create something new for your client. One agency that seems to do this with ease on a regular basis is W+K and when they team up with Grow and Google they produce something really unique that shows just how the world of advertising is changing in clever new ways.

In a campaign for Nike, W+K and Grow created a series of Real-Time ads that were designed to let fans celebrate, remix, and share customized posters, and images within 10 seconds of a sporting event happening live. “Phenomenal Shot” uses a Nike sponsored player rendered  in 3D along with a series of prewritten headlines, phrases, stickers, and filters, that allow fans to remix that moment and share with friends across a variety of digital networks.

The Real-Time Ads are rendered with a  3D-Engine and then distributed via the Google Ad Network across all devices creating an immersive experience powered by HTML5, CSS, and java script. Using the gyroscope that is built in to smartphones and tablets fans can spin the Nike athlete in 3D space to create the perfect shot before embellishing with ad-ons. Since the entire experience is rendered with WebGL the experience happens within the browser and there is no need for plugins or a dedicated app. Pretty damn slick, and a great way to promote your brand without being overly pushy or doing a hard sell. For more info on #ArtCopyCode click here.

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What if Wacom Built a Tablet Computer? They Are.

If you are a designer or artist working with digital tools like Photoshop or Illustrator, you might have had a chance to work with the Wacom Cintiq. If you are unfamiliar with the Cintiq, it is Wacom’s monitor/input tablet combined. It allows you to draw and paint right on the surface, mimicking an actual physical work surface.

If you are an iPad or other tablet user, you have probably installed a few creative apps like Procreate, or ArtRage and use your tablet for sketching, drawing, photo-retouching, etc. with some kind of input stylus. And while your stylus does a pretty good job, in many ways it is not a substitute for your Wacom tablet or Cintiq. The fact is most styluses, have larger input tips, and almost all of them don’t offer pressure sensitivity like the Wacom. So, why hasn’t Wacom jumped into the tablet fray? Well they have.

The Wacom Cintiq Companion, and Comanion Hybrid are two new tablets from Wacom. The Companion runs a full blown version of Windows 8 and allows you full access to all of your desktop creative tools. The Companion Hybrid runs Android and give you access to all of your favorite Android creative apps, like Procreate, Sketch, and ArtRage.

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Both tablets offer an immersive on-screen creative experience and take full advantage of Wacom’s pressure sensitive stylus on a high resolution portable screen. The Companion running Windows 8 is essentially a mobile workstation with multi-touch control, pressure sensitive input and cloud based connectivity allowing you to create and share you r work from anywhere. Frankly I find this to be very exciting, because it take what I do on my iPad and extends it allowing me to be more creative from anywhere.

The overall specs for both tablets looks pretty impressive, especially for a first effort. Screen resolution is 1920 by 1080, Intel® CORE™ i-7 processor, 2048 levels pen pressure, 256 or 512 GB solid state drive, 16.7 million color display, 8 gig of RAM… I hope that Wacom is successful with this, because competition is a good thing, and hopefully it means Apple, and stylus manufacturers will step up their game resulting in better products for everyone.

There is no word on pricing and or availability as of yet, but you can sign up for email announcements about the tablets as they get closer to a launch date and release pricing info.

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Condé Nast – Editorialist

Condé Nast is probably one of the best publishers of magazines for digital devices like your tablet or phone. They have embraced the technology and taken full advantage of  extensive interactive components that make their publications more immersive. Like any other publisher of content in todays world they are not free from the effects of a public trained to gather all their content for free online.

At Future Lions 2013 competition in Cannes this year, one of the winners was an idea presented for Condé Nast to keep the publisher relevant in an ever changing digital content world. The winner for Condé Nast’s magazine portfolio was actually something rather simple, and quite compelling. Part Flipboard, part Utne reader. It is a Condé Nast app that allows readers to select their favorite articles from any Condé Nast magazine, and then build your own monthly publication that brings all of your favorites together in one space for a monthly fee. This is something that publishers should latch on to.

The Never Ending Growing Impact of Social Media.

Most of the information in the image below isn’t really new, or ground breaking. If you don’t know the impact that social media has had on the internet/mobile world in the last 8 years you must have been living on a deserted island. None the less, since an image is worth a thousand words, feast your eyes upon this infographic and behold Americans’ increasing obsession with social media. One interesting little nugget is the increasing use of tablet based internet usage while watching TV.

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Razorfish is Planning to Enhance Your Consumer Experience.

While parts of this video might seem like an impractical way to experience a shopping experience, I guarantee you this is in your near future. As smart phones, tablets, interactive signage, and devices like Microsoft’s Surface and Kinect become more ubiquitous, this kind of experience will be more common. The example below centers around shopping for clothes, and actually eliminates trying things on. I doubt that step will ever go away, but this kind of digital interaction combined with real world experiences is coming.

Design Within Reach Gets an iPad App.

I’m a fan of Design Within Reach. I know that the name of the company is deceiving since their product line is not within the reach of many. I know DWR has also had it’s share of controversy in the past, and that many times you can find products they cary elsewhere. I’m a fan because they have championed high quality modern design, and exposed modern design to so many people over the last 15 years.

Today DWR introduced their new iPad app. While the app is primarily a shopping tool for DWR’s inventory of products, it is much more. The app is a rich interactive tool that features designer profiles, timelines, videos, interviews, a room designer and more. In many ways this app reminds me of an interactive book, similar to Phaidon’s Design Classics which was introduced for the iPad a few years ago.

DWR’s app is a nice example of the changing face of interactive content, and how the iPad and other tablets are forever changing the way we absorb and interact with digital content. While this app could be ported to a website, the result wouldn’t be the same. Like so many applications designed specifically for touch screen devices DWR’s app encourages  the user to do more. It creates an experience that goes beyond online shopping, educating and inspiring. Even if you are unable to purchase the products that DWR sells, this app is a great resource for those interested modern design. By making the inspire and learn sections equal to the shopping section DWR has created an experience that is open to all and reinforces their brand. I hope we see more of this kind of thing in the future. Companies like IKEA have already jumped on this band wagon, and frankly I’d rather experience something like this over Amazon.com any day.

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Desktop Chair by Moku Woodworking Cradles Your Tablet.

When you have a piece of computer hardware where the design is as simple and elegant as the iPad, the last thing you want is an ugly stand to hold it. You want something as simple and elegant as the tablet itself. Something that blends in, or fades away.

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Desktop Chair by Moku Woodware does just that. The stand is a simple piece of bent hand made basswood that cradles your device at a slight angle in both portrait and landscape mode. When in use, the only visible portion of the stand is the bottom lip that is about the same height as tablets bezel. The simple shape is wide enough to support up to a virtually all tablets and laptops with a thickness of 1.2 inches. The interior features a non slip base for added protection.

At $37.99 the price is right to.