Theodore Watson

Clouds, an Interactive Film from James George and Jonathan Minard.

There is a brave new world of art meets programming that has been emerging out of the shadows for a few years now. Artists are using open source programming languages like Processing and Arduino to take complex ideas and render them into real works of interactive art.

The video below from  is an interactive film that documents and interviews a number of these emerging artist.  James George and Jonathan Minard have launched a Kickstarter about 6 months ago to complete this interactive film and I hope they meet their goal. With 39 days left they have attained about a third of the money they need.

The trailer for”Clouds” has a great look, and listening to the artists that are interviewed are truly inspiring.  Take five minutes on this Friday morning and give it a look.

“Over the last year the team has captured interviews with over 30 new media artists, curators, designers, and critics, using this new 3D cinema format called RGBD. CLOUDS presents a generative portrait of this digital arts community in a videogame-likeenvironment. The artists inhabit a shared space with their code-based creations, allowing you to follow your curiosity through a network of stories. The interview subjects in CLOUDS include Bruce SterlingCasey ReasDaniel ShiffmanGolan LevinGreg BorensteinJer ThorpJesse Louis-RosenbergJessica RosenkrantzJosh NimoyKarolina SobeckaKarsten “Toxi” SchmidtKyle McDonaldLindsay HowardRegine DebattySatoru HigaShantell MartinTheodore WatsonVera GlahnZachary Lieberman and many more.”

3D Graffiti.

GML is a new open source piece of software that was developed by Jamie Wilkinson, Evan Roth, Theodore Watson and Chris Sugrue. The software which is available for Mac, Windows, Linux, and the iPad imports a .gml file which is created with “Graffiti Analysis”, and then converts it to 3D geometry based on the data. The file is then exported as a .stl file (a common file format compatible with most 3D software packages including Blender, Maya and 3DS Max) which can be printed using a rapid prototyping machine. The software extrudes time in the Z space and pen speed is represented by the thickness of the model at any given point.

Originally created for the Street and Studio exhibition at the Kunsthalle Wein, Evan Roth collaborated with an anonymous Viennese graffiti artist and had the sculpture printed in ABS plastic. Graffiti motion data of these tags were captured on the streets at various points around Vienna. This is a great example of how outsider art manages to take emerging technology like motion tracking, and rapid prototyping and elevate the experience.

A version of Graffiti Analysis 2.0 is available here for Linux, Windows, and OSX . It comes with data files collected from Vienna graffiti artists. The GA 3D software and source code will be available at graffitianalysis.com shortly, and of course there is already an iPhone slash iPad app called DustTag that you can download from the app store.

Click Image For Video.