Video Production

“Welcome to Airbnb” and the Making Of.

One of the hottest trends in ad video right now is the creation of epic miniature sets that involve a single tracking camera move. The video below for Airbnb is a prime example of this. Created by TBWA\Singapore the entire production of this sixty second spot took 5 weeks, 85 takes, and an army of people to pull off. The result is fantastic though. The crew wanted everything to look hand made, and use no CGI to complete the look. The second video is a behind the scenes look at how they pulled this off, and the thinking behind the commercial. It offers great insight into the process and how it relates to the finished piece.

TNT – “The People Network” and How It Was Made.

Below are two videos from who produced TNT’s “The People Network” directed by Mischa Rozema. There is the original spot, and then the making of / behind the scenes video as well. The original spot is a really, really solid piece of work, but as usual I am completely fascinated by the video that shows just how complex the production of this was. One of the things I really like about the behind the scenes documentary, is the fact that they talk about developing storyboards, and using animatics to determine things like cameras, lighting, lenses, etc. All of those things are hugely important for such an ambitious project. The crew is listed below both videos and I have to say, I’m surprised its not larger considering what went into the production and post production of this spot. For more info on the production click here.

“We decided to really push what could be achieved in camera by actually creating a full size human truck on the set. It worked by having a huge, truck-sized, metal rig that could be pulled by an actual truck. We then filled it with an incredible Czech stunt team (famous for big Hollywood blockbusters) that had been rehearsing for weeks and gave the whole project a realistic approach.”

Credits TNT “THE PEOPLE NETWORK”:

Agency: Etcetera
Concept : Peter van Leeuwen, Markus Ravenhorst
Art Director : Peter van Leeuwen
Copywriter : Markus Ravenhorst
TV-producer agency : Robert Roosenstein

Date shoot : July 2014
Locations/Studios : Prague, Austria, Belgium & Amsterdam
Film / Video-Material : digital (Epic Red Dragon)

Production Company : PostPanic
Director : Mischa Rozema
Executive Producer : Jules Tervoort, Annejes van Liempd
Producer (Liege) : Liene Berina
Production Assistant : Kristian Stoykov

Post Production: PostPanic
Head of PostProduction : Ivor Goldberg
Supervisor on set : Chris Staves, Matthijs Joor

Line Production Company : Savage, Prague
Executive Producer : Klara Kralickova
Line Producer : Vojta Ruzicka
Art Direction : David Baxa
Stunt Team : Filmka stunt team, Czech Republic
Stunt Coordinator : Jiri First
Making of : Jan Svejkar

D.O.P. : Jon Gaute Espevold

Grading : Scott Harris @ Glassworks
Off-line edit : PostPanic
Editor off-line : Benjamin Putland
On-line edit : PostPanic

Music composition & Sound Design: Pivot Audio / Guy Amitai
Sound Mix: Lawrence Horne

Stills
Photographer : Jiri Svorc
Image manipulator : Nick Strong

Cast

Marek Zelinka : TNT driver, Daan Daams : wink guy, Sabina Feldmanova : customer woman, Petr Kocourek : truck driver, Mikulas Matous : Kid 1, Matej Splichal : Kid 2

Post Production team PostPanic

VFX Supervisor : Ivor Goldberg, Chris Staves
Assistant Post Producer : Liene Berina
3D & VFX Artists : Matthijs Joor, Jeroen Aerts, Chris Staves, Marti Pujol, Dimos Hadjisavvas, Juri Agostinelli, Dieuwer Feldbrugge, Guido Ekker (intern), Francois Heysen (intern)
2D/3D Artists : Doma Harkai, Erwin vd IJssel, Stefano Paron, Donat Aron Ertsey, Hubert Heutinck (intern)
Matte Painting : Marco Iozzi, Marti Pujol
Tracking & Match Moving : Giso Spijkerman

Additional Post Production:

Additional VFX support : Andrea Staiano, Thiago Porto, Dennis Volkerts, Glassworks
Rotoscoping : Dot VFX, Roto Art Studios
Motion Capture : Stepan Kment, Bohemia Interactive a.s.

Regular Division.

Talk about a head bender. The video below is a visual twister, and when you think about the amount of work that had to be done in post to complete this it’s pretty insane. After watching it I went back and scrubbed through the video and tried to get a count on the number of masks, and nested comps it would have taken to pull this off. I work in After Effects every day, so I am keenly aware of how organization of layers, comps, masks, and other elements play a crucial role in your final output. All I can say is artist Joe Hamilton, has to be one of the most organized video artists out there. The clip is visually stunning, with nice optical illusions, sound design, and mesmerizing visual impact. I’d love to see a behind the scenes look at how this and may of his other works are created.

“Joe Hamilton makes use of technology and found material to create intricate and complex compositions online, offline and between.”

Behind The Scenes of Violent Soho’s “Saramona Said”.

This is a great behind the scenes video, because the guy that made it actually talks about what they did and how they did it. Most of the time the Behind the Scenes stuff is just a bunch of clips that show the build and shoot without much insight or detail. This goes a bit further, letting you know things like inspiration, actual gear used, and process. Below the Behind the Scenes, is the final music video they produced.

Troublemaker’s Kindle Paperwhite, and The Making Of.

Amazon has been promoting it’s Paperwhite Kindle with some pretty fun advertising locally, but this spot for China is really fun. Below are two videos. The first features two separate spots for the device, the second is the making of video. I love watching the first one, but I am completely fascinated by the second which shows all the preproduction work that went into making these 30 second shorts. No stop motion, all live action and post production animation, with a ton of wire removal and painting out of specific sections of each frame. I have no idea how much time was spent in post on this but I’m pretty sure “quite a bit” is an understatement.

GlassFin Shows How it Made the Honda Wave.

Every day people see commercials on TV, the internet, in movie theaters, their mobile handset, etc. Most of the time we never really think about the amount of work that goes into the final production of that 30 to 60 second clip. The reality is, there is a boat load of post work that is done, after a boat load of on set production work. Then there is the preproduction work, with scripts, storyboards, style frames, and more. Below are two videos that show just how much post work goes into making that commercial sexy enough to maybe get you to buy a product.

The videos from Glassfin are for the Honda Wave 110. The first shows the final directors cut of the spot. A whopping thirty seconds of video. The second shows the compositing and post production breakdown of how this was put together with live action footage, CGI, particle systems, color grading, and so much more. If you have ever been curious about what it takes to make an award winning commercial, this is an excellent example.

Lexus and Instagram Make a Video.

With Instagram one of the white hot darlings of social media 2.0 it’s no surprise that Lexus turned to it to create one of their latest ads.

The video below was uploaded a couple of days ago to YouTube, and features images taken by 212 instagramers over the course of a day highlighting the new 2014 Lexus IS.  Using hundreds of their shots the images were uploaded to Instagram, with a specific hashtag for the car. At the same time images were captured onsite and edited with what looked like Adobe Premier. (you get a brief glimpse of the edit suite in the YouTube video below). For a full list of participants click through to YouTube to see their names.