Video Sharing

The Growing Mobile Video Explosion

Yesterday Facebook, owner of Instagram announced they were adding video to the popular image sharing software. This is probably to counter act Vine from Twitter. Both services now offer users the option to upload 15 or 6 second video clips respectively. The addition of video to Instagram helps to solidify the ever growing presence of video on the internet and mobile devices.

Mobile Internet specialist Skyfire has produced a new infographic that details the various challenges facing mobile operators looking to make mobile video work efficiently and effectively.

“Who’s in Charge of Managing the Mobile Video Deluge?” by Skyfire looks at the different ways in which mobile operators and content publishers view video traffic. At the same time it also casts an eye over the potential ways by which current trends could meander in the not too distant future.

Skyfire_Infographic_-_Mobile_Video_and_Operators

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“Path” A New Kind of Social Networking.

Recently my Social Networking apps have begun to narrow. I use Facebook less, and I was never a Twitter power user. In recent months as many of you know I have been using Instagram on a regular basis and find it becoming my first choice in mobile Social Media applications. It’s not that I have completely dropped Facebook, or Twitter, instead I use them as aggregator for my blog posts, and for my Instagram posts. A new application that I have begun exploring is also climbing up my list of Social Media favorites, and that is Path.

Path is a Social Network that is designed to, “to make it simple and easy to relive and explore your memories in deep and rich ways.” with your close friends and family. One of the basic goals of Path is to do for video what Instagram is doing for photos. Path lets you shoot 10 seconds of video, and then share it with a close group of friends and family.  In the current version, Path limits you to a network of just 50 people, but when you think about it, the number of people who most of us interact with on a regular basis in Facebook or Twitter, is probably 50 or less. Path isn’t about games, or fan pages, or over sharing. Path is about the basics of Social Networking, with simplicity in mind and a focus on capturing your important moments with video.

Currently Path is on version 1.7, and is still getting settled. The current version improves on the original by letting users now share to other networks to a limited extent. Originally, Path videos could be shared only with other Path users. Now you can alert your Facebook friends to the existence of a video, but they can’t actually play the video in Facebook; instead, they have to get a Path account as well.

There are a couple of things about Path that I find intriguing. First is ten seconds of video enough, when you can share so much more on other networks like YouTube, Facebook, and Vimeo. Second, with a fairly closed environment, will path take off? I think the limit of ten seconds of video might seem ridiculous now, but so did the 140 character limit in Twitter to many people. As for the closed Eco system Path offers, there is something comforting about the security. Look at all the people who have had their Facebook account hacked in the last year and spammed your wall with all sorts of posts. Path might be on to something by keeping your network to 50 of your closest friends and relatives.