Wacom

Adonit’s Jot Touch Stylus Might Be a Dream Come True.

I am on a constant search for a better iPad stylus. I want something for the iPad that feels like using a stylus on a Wacom Cintiq. Since buying my first iPad I have tried at least 4 different kinds of styluses, settling in on the Wacom Bamboo, but now having seent he video for the Jot Touch, I think it might be time to switch.

At $99.00 the Jot Touch isn’t cheap, but the feature set looks like it will justify the cost. This is the first iPad stylus to offer real pressure sensitivity, and the construction of the tip allows for more precise drawing and painting. At the end of the stylus is a transparent disc centered on a small metal ball that is attached to the handle. This allows the stylus to function like your fingertip, with the precision of a pen or pencil. This is a huge benefit for anyone whose drawing or painting style needs to be a little tighter than a quick sketch. In addition to the refined tip, Jot Touch also features a number of  shortcut buttons, Bluetooth connectivity and USB recharging.

Right now the stylus pressure sensitivity and buttons are supported by a number of applications including a couple of my faves, ArtRage, Sketchbook Pro, Notes Plus, Animation Desk, and ProCreate.

Wacom Bamboo iPad Stylus Update.

I’ve been using the new Wacom Bamboo Stylus for the iPad for about two weeks now. My primary use has been sketching and painting in a variety of programs like Brushes, Art Rage, and Sketchbook Pro. I am going to say hands down that this is the best stylus I have used to date. It kicks the pants of the Dagi stylus which was my primary drawing tool, and it beats every other one that I have tried so far.

The Bamboo is similar to most of the other rubber tipped styluses out there, but the way it feels in your hand makes all the difference in the world. It has weight to it, and the shorter length lets it rest more naturally in your hand as you draw. That shorter length comes in handy, or at least in my case it does because it helps me keep my hand off the iPad surface as I draw and paint. I know this sounds odd, but there is something about the way I hold the stylus that makes it easier to keep my hand from coming in contact with the glass screen. It probably has something to do with the perfectly weighted balance of the stylus as it rests in your hand. The sturdy metal construction simply feels better than any other stylus for the iPad that I have used.

Drawing and painting with the Bamboo is simply wonderful. The smaller 6mm rubber tip makes it easy to see what you are working on. The stylus moves easily over the surface of the iPad. Depending on what application you are using and how many layers your drawing or painting has there is little to no lag time behind the stylus tip, and the digital painting surface. Applications like Art Rage, tend to lag a bit when using oil paints with heavy textures applied, but it’s not that bad really. The bottom line here is, Wacom did their homework and have hit this one out of the park.

At 30 dollars the price of the Bamboo might put some people off, but I think it is totally worth the money. If you are an artist, designer, or anyone that uses your iPad to write notes on this stylus is for you.

Wacom Bamboo Stylus for the iPad

Yesterday after a four week delay, my new iPad stylus arrived from Amazon. The Bamboo Stylus from Wacom. I am smitten. The digital painting below was made with 3 iPad applications and the Bamboo Stylus. I could have done this with any of the other styluses that I own for the iPad, but none of them would have done it with the ease and accuracy of this one from Wacom.

The stylus tip is accurate, and the taper helps with positioning it in the right location. The stylus moves easily and freely over the iPad surface making the drawing feel natural and relaxed. ( well as relaxed as digital painting can feel. This isn’t like painting on canvas or paper )

This painting took about 4 hours to complete. The process was pretty straight forward. The plane was sketched out on paper, and photographed with my iPhone. I sent the image to my gmail account, and downloaded it to the iPad. Once the image was in my library, I opened it with Photogene, adjusted the contrast of the red pencil sketch, straightened it, and saved it. I then opened the the sketch in Brushes, set it as a reference layer, and blocked the color and shading in on a layer above it. Once I w satisfied with the color blocking, I saved the file to my library, opened Art Rage, and imported the color blocked initial painting. From here I used Art Rage to finish the painting, working with oil paints, flat and round brushes, and tweaking the drying settings to allow for color blending and texture build up.

The results aren’t going to win me any awards, but I’m off to a good start. I’m thinking with some practice, I should be able to get proficient enough to use these tools to paint and draw from life, rather than starting with a base sketch that I essentially scanned in. Only time will tell.

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Wacom Introduces an iPad Stylus.

Since the iPad hit the market a year ago, I have been clamoring for Wacom to get in the game and make a stylus for said device. Well it looks like my wish is about to come true.

Wacom, the largest and most popular manufacturer of graphics tablets for the desktop computer has decided to produce a stylus for the iPad. This is a big deal, because most of the current styluses suck. I know I have given positive reviews to both the Touchtec, and Dagi styluses, but at the end of the day they really are lacking when it comes to responsiveness and accuracy. With Wacom entering the market, it looks like we will be getting a stylus designed and built by the leader on the desktop side.

Unlike most of the bulky, thick tipped styluses on the market, the Wacom stylus is lighter, has a more natural feeling in the hand, and the tip is 25% smaller which translates to better accuracy, and a natural feeling when writing, drawing or painting. Wacom’s many years of graphics tablet and digital pen making experience will hopefully lead to a much nicer stylus. That 25% smaller tip (6mm vs, 8mm) is a huge plus for me.

Wacom describes the stylus as having “satin-textured metal body and balanced weighting” which sounds like it will be as comfortable to hold the digital pen you are used to with Wacom’s line of desktop graphics tablets.

If you are wondering why you would want to have a stylus instead of using your finger, there are a number of reasons, especially if you use any of the drawing and painting applications available for the iPad. A stylus gives you better control and a more natural form of input when you draw on the iPad. I know that sounds counter intuitive, but your finger tip is fat, and it blocks what you are seeing unless you are zoomed way in on the screen. And when it comes to note taking, I can write with a stylus faster than I can type on the virtual keyboard.

For me, I am looking forward to trying this out with apps like Brushes, Art Rage, and Sketch though. I have been using the Daggi stylus for a while, and it works. The thing is though, you have to conform to holding the stylus in a specific way which makes using it challenging at times. I can’t wait until this is in a store where I can check it out in person. I have a feeling that like all Wacom products it is going to raise the bar quite a bit for other stylus manufacturers.

The Bamboo Stylus will be priced at $29.99 and become available mid-May on the Wacom site, at Amazon, and in most electronics retail outlets.