Wine

Eto Saves Your Vino

I look at a lot of Kickstarter campaigns, and every once in a while I come across something that is not only useful but something I would actually use. Eto is one of those Kickstarter items. I’m in.

Eto is a beautifully designed wine decanter with an innovative preservation system that keeps wine preserved for at least 12 days, ensuring you never waste a drop of that precious nectar again. The decanter solves a simple problem, keeping air away for the wine which causes it to oxidize and begin to take on a vinegar taste. Approximately 13,208,600 gallons of wine go down the sink every year for this very reason, and Eto wants to stop that from happening.

The creator Tom Cotton, is a Welsh London-based product designer, with nearly 20 years experience in bringing products from concept to market. Backers were able to pre-orderEto (Welsh for “Again”) on Kickstarter for $75.00 on the Kickstarter site but it looks like the goal has been reached so  financial it will be available to buy for $100.00 around the end of the year.

The design of this is simple and elegant and the best part is it fulfills what good industrial design is supposed to do. It solves a problem, and it does it in a beautiful well thought out way.

 

Summer Rosé,

The first day of summer is tomorrow, so keeping up with this weeks build up to summer theme I have created a poster of 10 rosés that you can drink now. None of them will break the bank and all of them are good choices for a hot summer afternoon. The list of wines is from Guyot’s rosé picks for 2013.

Prices range from 10 bucks to around 28. The rating scale from Guyot is pretty simple. 13-14/20 is a Good wine, 15-16/20 is a very good wine, 17-18/20 is excellent, anything above is outstanding.

In years past rosés have gotten a bad wrap, especially in the United States. These 10 will change any perception you have about the quality of rosé wines, and hopefully get you drinking rosés if you haven’t started already.

Summer-rose

Shooting Analog, and Drinking Wine.

Back in December I bought a 35-year-old Olympus OM2 35mm film camera and a bunch of lenses on eBay. I shot a single roll of film to test out the meter, shutter, and body for typical things like light leaks and exposure accuracy. After shooting my first roll of film in about 15 years, I took it in for developing and promptly forgot about it for 3 months. Today, I was at Crick and remembered to pick up the disc and check out the images I shot back in December. So how’d the camera do? better than I expected, considering there were a number of adult libations consumed while testing it out.

The images below are the result of an evening of good friends, dinner, wine, the holidays, and an impending winter storm.

004_3 013_12 034_33 018_17 010_9 014_13 011_10 012_11 002_1

That Wine is STACT.

Wine racks are one of those things that haven’t really changed much over the decades. Most racks consist of boxes stacked together at 45 or 90 degree angles big enough to hold a bottle on it’s side. So when I saw STACT on Kick starter this morning I have to say I was just a wee bit happy.

STACT designed by Eric Pfeiffer is a modular wine storage system that is made from aircraft-grade anodized aluminum and premium wood veneers. The system is modular, and scalable to grow with your ever expanding collection of fine French Bordeaux’s.

Each STACT panel comes with pre-installed anchors for a secure mount to the wall via the included F-brackets. The system allows you to mix and match six finishes which include walnut, white oak, zebrano, piano black, pure white, and electric orange.

Right now STACT is going into production with delivery scheduled for November. For more information go to the STACT Kickstarter Page.

“With a modern aesthetic in mind, STACT is crafted from high quality aircraft-grade aluminum and premium wood veneers, with a high-end appeal previously found only in modern wine cellars, avant-garde restaurants, and wine bars. The patent-pending versatile and space efficient modular design is infinitely expandable and customizable, a cinch to assemble, and seamlessly integrates into any space or décor.”